Two thirds of forest walkers with Japanese cedar pollinosis visit forests even during the pollen season

Emi Morita, Jun Nagano, Hirokazu Yamamoto, Isao Murakawa, Mieko Aikawa, Taro Shirakawa

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: The most common type of pollinosis in Japan is Japanese cedar pollinosis (JCP). While forest walking is a common form of recreation for Japanese people, it has been unclear whether forest walkers with JCP still choose to visit forested areas during the pollen season or whether they avoid those areas, and as such, the aim of this study was to investigate this question. Methods: The study participants were all healthy men and women volunteers aged 20 years or over who visited the Tokyo University Forest in Chiba during 4 different days. The survey was conducted using self-administered questionnaires. Results: The number of available responses was 498. Of these, 112 participants who experienced JCP were included in the analysis. Seventy-three participants (65.2%) responded that they visit forests even during the pollen season. The association between forest walking choices during the pollen season and self-rated levels of pollinosis symptoms was not statistically significant (Cramer's V = 0.13, p = 0.47). As many as 60% of the participants who reported serious symptom levels responded that they visit forested areas even during the pollen season. Conclusions: These results revealed that two thirds of forest walkers who had experienced JCP visited forests even during the pollen season. This indicates the further need for public service announcements informing people with JCP that the risk of pollen exposure and subsequent JCP reaction is increased by visiting forested areas during the pollen season.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)383-388
Number of pages6
JournalAllergology International
Volume58
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 2009

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Cryptomeria
Walkers
Seasonal Allergic Rhinitis
Pollen
Walking
Forests
Recreation
Tokyo
Volunteers
Japan

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Immunology and Allergy

Cite this

Two thirds of forest walkers with Japanese cedar pollinosis visit forests even during the pollen season. / Morita, Emi; Nagano, Jun; Yamamoto, Hirokazu; Murakawa, Isao; Aikawa, Mieko; Shirakawa, Taro.

In: Allergology International, Vol. 58, No. 3, 01.01.2009, p. 383-388.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Morita, Emi ; Nagano, Jun ; Yamamoto, Hirokazu ; Murakawa, Isao ; Aikawa, Mieko ; Shirakawa, Taro. / Two thirds of forest walkers with Japanese cedar pollinosis visit forests even during the pollen season. In: Allergology International. 2009 ; Vol. 58, No. 3. pp. 383-388.
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