Tympanic Temperature and Skin Temperatures During Upper Limb Exercise in Patients With Spinal Cord Injury

Kojiro Ishii, Masahiro Yamasaki, Satoshi Muraki, Takashi Komura, Kunio Kikuchi, Toshiaki Miyagawa, Shigeo Fujimoto, Kazuya Maeda

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

To clarify changes in body temperature during endurance exercise in patients with spinal cord injury (SCI), we measured tympanic temperature (Tty) and skin temperature in the head, arm, chest, thigh, shin and calf in 5 patients with SCI (T 6-T 12) and 7 normal controls during 30 minutes arm cranking exercise (20 watts) from 10 minutes before the initiation of exercise until 10 minutes after the termination of exercise in an artificial climate room at a temperature of about 25oC with a relative humidity of about 50%. The Tty in the SCI group was lower than that in the control group from 10 minutes before the initiation of exercise to 10 minutes after the termination of exercise with a significant difference only at the initiation of exercise. The difference in Tty slightly decreased with continuation of exercise. The Tty in the SCI group at rest was 36.05 — 37.15oC. Four patients in this group showed a decrease of 0.04— 0.12oC in the early stage and an increase of 0.66oC ±0.19 (mean± SD) at the end of exercise over the value at the initiation of exercise. The skin temperature was lower in the SCI group than in the control group in all sites excluding the arm. Significant differences were observed in the head in the early stage of exercise and after exercise, in the chest from 10 minutes before the initiation of exercise to 5 minutes after the termination of exercise, in the thigh from 10 minutes before the initiation of exercise to 10 minutes after the termination of exercise, in the shin 10 minutes and 5 minutes before the initiation of exercise, and in the calf from before to 15 minutes after the initiation of exercise. In the SCI group, marked individual differences were observed in the skin temperatures in the thigh, shin, and calf, suggesting specificity of the skin temperature response in and near the paralysis area. Results in Tty in this study suggested no heat retention in the SCI patients. Therefore, the risk for heat disorders seems to be low during moderate or mild exercise under moderate temperature environment at a temperature of about 25°C with a relative humidity of about 50% even when the skin temperature is low, and thermolysis is not marked.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)447-455
Number of pages9
JournalJapanese Journal of Physical Fitness and Sports Medicine
Volume44
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 1995

Fingerprint

Skin Temperature
Spinal Cord Injuries
Upper Extremity
Exercise
Temperature
Thigh
Arm
Humidity
Thorax
Hot Temperature
Head
Body Temperature Changes
Control Groups

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation

Cite this

Tympanic Temperature and Skin Temperatures During Upper Limb Exercise in Patients With Spinal Cord Injury. / Ishii, Kojiro; Yamasaki, Masahiro; Muraki, Satoshi; Komura, Takashi; Kikuchi, Kunio; Miyagawa, Toshiaki; Fujimoto, Shigeo; Maeda, Kazuya.

In: Japanese Journal of Physical Fitness and Sports Medicine, Vol. 44, No. 4, 01.01.1995, p. 447-455.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ishii, Kojiro ; Yamasaki, Masahiro ; Muraki, Satoshi ; Komura, Takashi ; Kikuchi, Kunio ; Miyagawa, Toshiaki ; Fujimoto, Shigeo ; Maeda, Kazuya. / Tympanic Temperature and Skin Temperatures During Upper Limb Exercise in Patients With Spinal Cord Injury. In: Japanese Journal of Physical Fitness and Sports Medicine. 1995 ; Vol. 44, No. 4. pp. 447-455.
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