Unusually high levels of bio-available phosphate in the soils of Ogasawara Islands, Japan: Putative influence of seabirds

Sayaka Morita, Hidetoshi Kato, Nobusuke Iwasaki, Yoshinobu Kusumoto, Keiichiro Yoshida, Syuntaro Hiradate

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Ogasawara Islands are important ecosystems sustaining many indigenous spices. To clarify the indigenous soil environments of Ogasawara Islands, we studied the chemistry of the soils. Many surface soils were low in bio-available P (0 to 0.55g P2O5 kg-1, average: 0.04g P2O5 kg-1 as Bray II P, n=22), but several soils were found to contain extremely large amounts of bio-available P (1.36 to 6.98g P2O5 kg-1, average: 2.93g P2O5 kg-1, n=5). From soil profile analyses, the authors concluded that the extremely large amount of bio-available P could not be explained by the effects of parent materials with high P contents nor the effect of fertilizations by human activity, but the effects of natural seabird activities in the past could be the cause. The soil profiles with large amounts of bio-available P indicate deep migration of soil materials from A horizons, which could be a result of intensive mixing of upper horizons by seabird activities. The intensive mixing was supported by the low mechanical impedance of the horizons for the P-accumulating soils (8.17±2.54kgcm-2, n=8) than those for the non-P-accumulating soils (17.46±3.52kgcm-2, n=36). It is likely that in the past seabirds, such as shearwaters, made burrows in the soils for nesting and propagating and inadvertently transported a large amount of P from the sea to the soils, resulting in the extremely large amounts of bio-available P in the present soils.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)155-164
Number of pages10
JournalGeoderma
Volume160
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 15 2010
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

seabird
seabirds
phosphate
phosphates
Japan
soil
soil profiles
soil profile
soil chemistry
spice
A horizons
impedance
edaphic factors
spices
burrows
parent material
burrow
soil surface
human activity
ecosystems

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Soil Science

Cite this

Unusually high levels of bio-available phosphate in the soils of Ogasawara Islands, Japan : Putative influence of seabirds. / Morita, Sayaka; Kato, Hidetoshi; Iwasaki, Nobusuke; Kusumoto, Yoshinobu; Yoshida, Keiichiro; Hiradate, Syuntaro.

In: Geoderma, Vol. 160, No. 2, 15.12.2010, p. 155-164.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Morita, Sayaka ; Kato, Hidetoshi ; Iwasaki, Nobusuke ; Kusumoto, Yoshinobu ; Yoshida, Keiichiro ; Hiradate, Syuntaro. / Unusually high levels of bio-available phosphate in the soils of Ogasawara Islands, Japan : Putative influence of seabirds. In: Geoderma. 2010 ; Vol. 160, No. 2. pp. 155-164.
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