Updated Look at the DCFC: the Fuel Cell Technology Using Solid Carbon as the Fuel

Noriko Hikosaka Behling, Shunsuke Managi, Mark C. Williams

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Particle processing is a key to using solid particles in fuel cell applications. Selectivity with regard to reactivity, impurities, etc. is an important feature and the treatment of particle surfaces could greatly impact the performance of direct carbon fuel cells. Solid fuel particles will become increasingly important in the future. Present energy conversion systems for solid fuels are too inefficient. New energy conversion systems for solid fuels with higher energy conversion efficiencies are possible. Fuel cell technology is a key technology in these new conversion systems. The direct carbon fuel cell (DCFC) operates on carbon particles obtained from a variety of solid fuel feedstocks. The DCFC is the only fuel cell designed to directly oxidize carbon particles in a special anode chamber. The particles are generally graphite structure with high purity. The electrolyte used is the high temperature solid oxide, molten carbonate, or hydroxide electrolyte. Since a pure stream of CO2 is produced, the stream can easily be sequestered and disposed. Pure carbon dioxide produced as a by-product would also have a market in many industries. A well-defined technology roadmap identifying key research and development (R&D) issues is necessary to provide a framework for the development of these systems and to prevent entrenchment in inherently inefficient technologies. This review paper describes the direct carbon fuel cell and its system, how it works, the developmental status, the characteristics of the carbon particles needed, and the research and development issues for the technology.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)181-187
Number of pages7
JournalMining, Metallurgy and Exploration
Volume36
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 1 2019

Fingerprint

Direct carbon fuel cells (DCFC)
fuel cell
Fuel cells
Carbon
carbon
Energy conversion
Electrolytes
research and development
electrolyte
Graphite
well technology
Carbonates
Carbon Dioxide
Oxides
Feedstocks
Conversion efficiency
Byproducts
particle
Molten materials
Carbon dioxide

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Control and Systems Engineering
  • Chemistry(all)
  • Geotechnical Engineering and Engineering Geology
  • Mechanical Engineering
  • Metals and Alloys
  • Materials Chemistry

Cite this

Updated Look at the DCFC : the Fuel Cell Technology Using Solid Carbon as the Fuel. / Behling, Noriko Hikosaka; Managi, Shunsuke; Williams, Mark C.

In: Mining, Metallurgy and Exploration, Vol. 36, No. 1, 01.02.2019, p. 181-187.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Behling, Noriko Hikosaka ; Managi, Shunsuke ; Williams, Mark C. / Updated Look at the DCFC : the Fuel Cell Technology Using Solid Carbon as the Fuel. In: Mining, Metallurgy and Exploration. 2019 ; Vol. 36, No. 1. pp. 181-187.
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