Uptake of enzymatically-digested hyaluronan by liver endothelial cells in vivo and in vitro

Shinichi Mochizuki, Arihiro Kano, Naohiko Shimada, Atsushi Maruyama

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Intravenously-injected hyaluronan (HA) is distributed into liver in which endothelium is a site of uptake and degradation of HA. The role and fate of HA have been widely investigated; however, effects of size and dose of HA on its metabolism have not been well documented yet. To investigate these effects, we prepared fluorescein-labeled HAs, according to the modified methods described by de Belder and Wik, which were enzymatically digested. The 90 kDa fluorescein-labeled HA gradually accumulated in a liver that was distributed into the endothelium; however, 10 kDa or less HA did not. Cell fractionation and flow cytometry further demonstrated the cell of uptake in the liver is an endothelial cell, both in vivo and in vitro. Interestingly, the largest uptake by liver endothelial cells in vitro was observed in 10 kDa HA, even though which did not accumulate in liver in vivo. These results suggest that the result observed with 10 kDa HA in vivo is due to the rapid excretion in urine. Thus, inhibiting of the digestion or suppressing of the urinary excretion would enhance uptake of HA in vivo. These ideas may help to deliver drugs or genes targeting to liver endothelium.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)83-97
Number of pages15
JournalJournal of Biomaterials Science, Polymer Edition
Volume20
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 2009

Fingerprint

Endothelial cells
Hyaluronic Acid
Liver
Endothelial Cells
Endothelium
Fluorescein
Flow cytometry
Fractionation
Metabolism
Cell Fractionation
In Vitro Techniques
Gene Targeting
Genes
Drug Delivery Systems
Degradation
Digestion
Flow Cytometry
Urine

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biophysics
  • Bioengineering
  • Biomaterials
  • Biomedical Engineering

Cite this

Uptake of enzymatically-digested hyaluronan by liver endothelial cells in vivo and in vitro. / Mochizuki, Shinichi; Kano, Arihiro; Shimada, Naohiko; Maruyama, Atsushi.

In: Journal of Biomaterials Science, Polymer Edition, Vol. 20, No. 1, 01.01.2009, p. 83-97.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{e55035ab2c4f4d3ca0388d74af1376bd,
title = "Uptake of enzymatically-digested hyaluronan by liver endothelial cells in vivo and in vitro",
abstract = "Intravenously-injected hyaluronan (HA) is distributed into liver in which endothelium is a site of uptake and degradation of HA. The role and fate of HA have been widely investigated; however, effects of size and dose of HA on its metabolism have not been well documented yet. To investigate these effects, we prepared fluorescein-labeled HAs, according to the modified methods described by de Belder and Wik, which were enzymatically digested. The 90 kDa fluorescein-labeled HA gradually accumulated in a liver that was distributed into the endothelium; however, 10 kDa or less HA did not. Cell fractionation and flow cytometry further demonstrated the cell of uptake in the liver is an endothelial cell, both in vivo and in vitro. Interestingly, the largest uptake by liver endothelial cells in vitro was observed in 10 kDa HA, even though which did not accumulate in liver in vivo. These results suggest that the result observed with 10 kDa HA in vivo is due to the rapid excretion in urine. Thus, inhibiting of the digestion or suppressing of the urinary excretion would enhance uptake of HA in vivo. These ideas may help to deliver drugs or genes targeting to liver endothelium.",
author = "Shinichi Mochizuki and Arihiro Kano and Naohiko Shimada and Atsushi Maruyama",
year = "2009",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1163/156856208X393518",
language = "English",
volume = "20",
pages = "83--97",
journal = "Journal of Biomaterials Science, Polymer Edition",
issn = "0920-5063",
publisher = "Taylor and Francis Ltd.",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Uptake of enzymatically-digested hyaluronan by liver endothelial cells in vivo and in vitro

AU - Mochizuki, Shinichi

AU - Kano, Arihiro

AU - Shimada, Naohiko

AU - Maruyama, Atsushi

PY - 2009/1/1

Y1 - 2009/1/1

N2 - Intravenously-injected hyaluronan (HA) is distributed into liver in which endothelium is a site of uptake and degradation of HA. The role and fate of HA have been widely investigated; however, effects of size and dose of HA on its metabolism have not been well documented yet. To investigate these effects, we prepared fluorescein-labeled HAs, according to the modified methods described by de Belder and Wik, which were enzymatically digested. The 90 kDa fluorescein-labeled HA gradually accumulated in a liver that was distributed into the endothelium; however, 10 kDa or less HA did not. Cell fractionation and flow cytometry further demonstrated the cell of uptake in the liver is an endothelial cell, both in vivo and in vitro. Interestingly, the largest uptake by liver endothelial cells in vitro was observed in 10 kDa HA, even though which did not accumulate in liver in vivo. These results suggest that the result observed with 10 kDa HA in vivo is due to the rapid excretion in urine. Thus, inhibiting of the digestion or suppressing of the urinary excretion would enhance uptake of HA in vivo. These ideas may help to deliver drugs or genes targeting to liver endothelium.

AB - Intravenously-injected hyaluronan (HA) is distributed into liver in which endothelium is a site of uptake and degradation of HA. The role and fate of HA have been widely investigated; however, effects of size and dose of HA on its metabolism have not been well documented yet. To investigate these effects, we prepared fluorescein-labeled HAs, according to the modified methods described by de Belder and Wik, which were enzymatically digested. The 90 kDa fluorescein-labeled HA gradually accumulated in a liver that was distributed into the endothelium; however, 10 kDa or less HA did not. Cell fractionation and flow cytometry further demonstrated the cell of uptake in the liver is an endothelial cell, both in vivo and in vitro. Interestingly, the largest uptake by liver endothelial cells in vitro was observed in 10 kDa HA, even though which did not accumulate in liver in vivo. These results suggest that the result observed with 10 kDa HA in vivo is due to the rapid excretion in urine. Thus, inhibiting of the digestion or suppressing of the urinary excretion would enhance uptake of HA in vivo. These ideas may help to deliver drugs or genes targeting to liver endothelium.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=60749092313&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=60749092313&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1163/156856208X393518

DO - 10.1163/156856208X393518

M3 - Article

C2 - 19105902

AN - SCOPUS:60749092313

VL - 20

SP - 83

EP - 97

JO - Journal of Biomaterials Science, Polymer Edition

JF - Journal of Biomaterials Science, Polymer Edition

SN - 0920-5063

IS - 1

ER -