Upward advancement of the nasolabial components at unilateral cleft lip repair prevents postoperative long lip

Kazuhide Matsunaga, Masaaki Sasaguri, Takeshi Mitsuyasu, Masamichi Ohishi, Norifumi Nakamura

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Abstract

Objective: To prevent the occurrence of postoperative long lip, longitudinal postoperative changes in nasolabial forms of patients with unilateral cleft lip who underwent primary lip repair with or without upward advancement of the nasolabial components were compared. Patients: Forty-three subjects (24 unilateral cleft lip and palate [UCLP] and 19 unilateral cleft lip solely, and cleft lip and alveolus [UCL/UCLA]) who underwent primary lip repair with upward advancement of the nasolabial components (NA group) and 30 subjects (16 UCLP and 14 UCL/UCLA) without upward advancement (LA group) were enrolled. Outcome Measures: Postoperative photos taken at 1 and 6 months and at 1, 2, and 3 years were used for measuring the heights of the nasal alar base (NBH), the columellar base (CBH), Cupid's peak (CPH), and the upper lip (ULH). The ratios of these measurements between the affected and unaffected sides were calculated in both groups. Results: In the LA group, the 3-year postoperative all-items ratios of UCLP were significantly larger than those at 1 month postoperatively, demonstrating drooping of the nasolabial tissues in the affected side (all P <.01). Furthermore, the 3-year postoperative CPH and ULH ratio of UCL/UCLA was significantly larger than that at 1 month postoperatively, demonstrating the long lip (P <.01). In the NA group, the NBH, CBH, and CPH ratios of both UCLP and UCL/UCLA did not show significant differences between 1 month and 3 years postoperatively. Conclusion: Upward advancement of the nasolabial components prevents postoperative long lip.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)e71-e80
JournalCleft Palate-Craniofacial Journal
Volume53
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2016

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All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Oral Surgery
  • Otorhinolaryngology

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