Use of mycophenolate mofetil suspension as part of induction therapy after living-donor liver transplant

Noboru Harada, Tomoharu Yoshizumi, Shohei Yoshiya, Kazuki Takeishi, Takeo Toshima, Shinji Itoh, Toru Ikegami, Mio Fukuda, Satohiro Masuda, Masaki Mori

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate recipient safety, tolerability, and pharmacokinetics of mycophenolate mofetil suspension compared with mycophenolate mofetil capsules as part of induction therapy after living-donor liver transplant. Materials and Methods: Between July 2017 and April 2019, we retrospectively enrolled 20 adult primary living-donor liver transplant recipients. Recipients were divided into 3 groups: group 1 received mycophenolate mofetil suspension of 3000 mg (n = 6), group 2 received 3000 mg mycophenolate mofetil via opened capsules (n = 8), and group 3 received mycophenolate mofetil suspension of 2000 mg (n = 6). Administration was started on postoperative day 1, with tacrolimus administered on postoperative day 2 or day 3. Results: The values of area under the plasma concentration time curve for 0 to 12 hours were significantly higher in the 3000 mg/day mycophenolate mofetil suspension group than in the 2000 mg/day mycophenolate mofetil suspension group (P = .024) and in the 3000mg/day mycophenolate mofetil capsule group (P = .013). Significant positive correlations were shown between blood concentration at 8 hours after administration and the plasma concentration time curve for 0 to 12 hours (r2 = 0.96; P < .001) in patients in the suspension group. No patients required mycophenolate mofetil reduction because of leukopenia and diarrhea. Only 1 biopsy-proven acute cellular rejection was recognized in the mycophenolate mofetil suspension group (at 2000 mg/day). There were no significant differences in frequency of opportunistic infections among the 3 groups. Conclusions: Mycophenolate mofetil suspension is useful as part of immunosuppressive induction therapy after living-donor liver transplant because its concentration increases greater than that of mycophenolate mofetil capsules and because of the low risk of rejection and adverse events.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)485-490
Number of pages6
JournalExperimental and Clinical Transplantation
Volume18
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2020

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Transplantation

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