Use of omeprazole, the proton pump inhibitor, as a potential therapy for the capecitabine-induced hand-foot syndrome

Shiori Hiromoto, Takehiro Kawashiri, Natsumi Yamanaka, Daisuke Kobayashi, Keisuke Mine, Mizuki Inoue, Mayako Uchida, Takao Shimazoe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Hand-foot syndrome (HFS), also known as palmar-plantar erythrodysesthesia (PPE), is a major side effect of capecitabine. Although the pathogenesis of HFS remains unknown, some studies suggested a potential involvement of inflammation in its pathogenesis. Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) have been reported to have anti-inflammatory effects. In this study, we investigated the ameliorative effects of omeprazole, a PPI on capecitabine-related HFS in mice model, and a real-world database. Repeated administration of capecitabine (200 mg/kg, p.o., five times a week for 3 weeks) increased fluid content, redness, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α substance of the mice hind paw. Co-administration of omeprazole (20 mg/kg, p.o., at the same schedule) significantly inhibited these changes induced by capecitabine. Moreover, based on the clinical database analysis of the Food and Drug Administration Adverse Event Reporting System, the group that has used any PPIs had a lower reporting rate of capecitabine-related PPE than the group that has not used any PPIs. (6.25% vs. 8.31%, p < 0.0001, reporting odds ratio (ROR) 0.74, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.65-0.83). Our results suggest that omeprazole may be a potential prophylactic agent for capecitabine-induced HFS.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)8964
Number of pages1
JournalScientific reports
Volume11
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 26 2021

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • General

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