Usefulness of a stool to stabilize dental chairs for cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR)

Norimasa Awata, Takashi Hitosugi, Yoichiro Miki, Masanori Tsukamoto, Yoshifumi Kawakubo, Takeshi Yokoyama

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) requires immediate start of manual chest compression (MCC) and defibrillation as soon as possible. During dental surgery, CPR could be started in the dental chair considering difficulty to move the patient from the dental chair to the floor. However, all types of dental chairs are not stable for MCC. We previously developed a procedure to stabilize a dental chair by using a stool. EUROPEAN RESUSCITATION COUNCIL (ERC) guideline 2015 adopted our procedure when cardiac arrest during dental surgery. The objective of this study was to verify the efficacy of a stool as a stabilizer in different types of dental chairs. Methods: Three health care providers participated in this study, and 8 kinds of dental chairs were examined. MCC were performed on a manikin that was laid on the backrest of a dental chair. A stool was placed under the backrest to stabilize the dental chair. The vertical displacement of the backrest by MCC was recorded by a camcorder and measured by millimeter. Next, the vertical displacement of the backrest by MCC were compared between with and without a stool. Results: In all 8 dental chairs, the method by using a stool significantly reduced the vertical displacements of the backrest by during MCC. The reduction ratio (mean [interquartile range]) varied between nearly 27 [20] and 87 [5] %. In the largest stabilization case, the displacement was 3.5 [0.5] mm with a stool versus 26 [5.5] mm without a stool (p < 0.001). Conclusions: Our procedure to stabilize dental chairs by using a stool reduced the displacement of a backrest against MCC in all chairs. Clinical relevance: Effective MCC could be performed in dental chairs by using a stool when sudden cardiac arrest occurs during dental surgery.

Original languageEnglish
Article number46
JournalBMC Emergency Medicine
Volume19
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 8 2019

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Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation
Tooth
Thorax
Manikins
Sudden Cardiac Death
Heart Arrest
Resuscitation
Health Personnel

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Emergency Medicine

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Usefulness of a stool to stabilize dental chairs for cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). / Awata, Norimasa; Hitosugi, Takashi; Miki, Yoichiro; Tsukamoto, Masanori; Kawakubo, Yoshifumi; Yokoyama, Takeshi.

In: BMC Emergency Medicine, Vol. 19, No. 1, 46, 08.08.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Background: Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) requires immediate start of manual chest compression (MCC) and defibrillation as soon as possible. During dental surgery, CPR could be started in the dental chair considering difficulty to move the patient from the dental chair to the floor. However, all types of dental chairs are not stable for MCC. We previously developed a procedure to stabilize a dental chair by using a stool. EUROPEAN RESUSCITATION COUNCIL (ERC) guideline 2015 adopted our procedure when cardiac arrest during dental surgery. The objective of this study was to verify the efficacy of a stool as a stabilizer in different types of dental chairs. Methods: Three health care providers participated in this study, and 8 kinds of dental chairs were examined. MCC were performed on a manikin that was laid on the backrest of a dental chair. A stool was placed under the backrest to stabilize the dental chair. The vertical displacement of the backrest by MCC was recorded by a camcorder and measured by millimeter. Next, the vertical displacement of the backrest by MCC were compared between with and without a stool. Results: In all 8 dental chairs, the method by using a stool significantly reduced the vertical displacements of the backrest by during MCC. The reduction ratio (mean [interquartile range]) varied between nearly 27 [20] and 87 [5] {\%}. In the largest stabilization case, the displacement was 3.5 [0.5] mm with a stool versus 26 [5.5] mm without a stool (p < 0.001). Conclusions: Our procedure to stabilize dental chairs by using a stool reduced the displacement of a backrest against MCC in all chairs. Clinical relevance: Effective MCC could be performed in dental chairs by using a stool when sudden cardiac arrest occurs during dental surgery.",
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