Validation study of Oxford classification of IgA nephropathy: The significance of extracapillary proliferation

Ritsuko Katafuchi, Toshiharu Ninomiya, Masaharu Nagata, Koji Mitsuiki, Hideki Hirakata

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

87 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background and objectives Approximately 70% of illicit cocaine consumed in the United States is contaminated with levamisole. Most commonly used as a veterinary antihelminthic agent, levamisole is a known immunomodulating agent. Prolonged use in humans has been associated with cutaneous vasculitis and agranulocytosis. We describe the development of a systemic autoimmune disease associated with antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) in cocaine users. This complication appears to be linked to combined cocaine and levamisole exposure. Design, setting, participants, & measurements Cases were identified between March 2009 and November 2010 at Massachusetts General Hospital's ANCA laboratory. Cocaine exposure was identified from patient history in all cases. Medical records were reviewed for clinical presentation and for laboratory and diagnostic evaluation. Results Thirty cases of ANCA positivity associated with cocaine ingestion were identified. All had antimyeloperoxidase antibodies and 50% also had antiproteinase 3 antibodies. Complete clinical and laboratory data were available for 18 patients. Arthralgia (83%) and skin lesions (61%) were the most frequent complaints at presentation. Seventy-two percent of patients reported constitutional symptoms, including fever, night sweats, weight loss, or malaise. Four patients had biopsy-proven vasculitis. Two cases of acute kidney injury and three cases of pulmonary hemorrhage occurred. From the entire cohort of 30, two cases were identified during the first 3 months of our study period and nine cases presented during the last 3 months. Conclusions We describe an association between the ingestion of levamisole-contaminated cocaine and ANCA-associated systemic autoimmune disease. Our data suggest that this is a potentially life-threatening complication of cocaine use.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2806-2813
Number of pages8
JournalClinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology
Volume6
Issue number12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 1 2011

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Validation Studies
Cocaine
Immunoglobulin A
Levamisole
Antineutrophil Cytoplasmic Antibodies
Vasculitis
Autoimmune Diseases
Eating
Skin
Agranulocytosis
Antibodies
Sweat
Arthralgia
Acute Kidney Injury
General Hospitals
Medical Records
Weight Loss
Fever
Hemorrhage
Biopsy

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Epidemiology
  • Critical Care and Intensive Care Medicine
  • Nephrology
  • Transplantation

Cite this

Validation study of Oxford classification of IgA nephropathy : The significance of extracapillary proliferation. / Katafuchi, Ritsuko; Ninomiya, Toshiharu; Nagata, Masaharu; Mitsuiki, Koji; Hirakata, Hideki.

In: Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology, Vol. 6, No. 12, 01.12.2011, p. 2806-2813.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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