Variability in microbial community and venting chemistry in a sediment-hosted backarc hydrothermal system: Impacts of subseafloor phase-separation

Satoshi Nakagawa, Ken Takai, Fumio Inagaki, Hitoshi Chiba, Jun Ichiro Ishibashi, Satoshi Kataoka, Hisako Hirayama, Takuro Nunoura, Koki Horikoshi, Yoshihiko Sako

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

126 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Phase-separation and -segregation (boiling/distillation of subseafloor hydrothermal fluids) represent the primary mechanisms causing intra-field variations in vent fluid compositions. To determine whether this geochemical process affects the formation of microbial communities, we examined the microbial communities at three different vent sites located within a few tens meters of one another. In addition to chimney structures, colonization devices capturing subseafloor communities entrained by the vent fluids were studied, using culture-dependent and -independent methods. Microbiological analyses demonstrated the occurrence of distinctive microbial communities in each of the hydrothermal niches. Within a chimney structure, there was a transition from a mixed community of mesophiles and thermophiles in the exterior parts to thermophiles in the interior. Beside the transition within a chimney structure, intra-field variations in microbial communities in vent fluids were apparent. Geochemical analysis demonstrated that different vent fluids have distinctive end-member compositions as a consequence of subseafloor phase-separation and -segregation, which were designated gas-depleted, normal and gas-enriched fluids. In comparison to gas-depleted and normal fluids, gas-enriched fluids harbored more abundant chemolithoautotrophs with gaseous component-dependent energy metabolism, such as hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis. Subseafloor phase-separation and -segregation may play a key role in supplying energy and carbon sources to vent-associated chemolithoautotrophs and subvent microbial communities.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)141-155
Number of pages15
JournalFEMS microbiology ecology
Volume54
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 1 2005

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venting
hydrothermal system
microbial community
Gases
fluid
sediment
gas
Distillation
Energy Metabolism
Carbon
fluid composition
methanogenesis
distillation
hydrothermal fluid
Equipment and Supplies
energy
niche
colonization
metabolism
carbon

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Microbiology
  • Ecology
  • Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology

Cite this

Variability in microbial community and venting chemistry in a sediment-hosted backarc hydrothermal system : Impacts of subseafloor phase-separation. / Nakagawa, Satoshi; Takai, Ken; Inagaki, Fumio; Chiba, Hitoshi; Ishibashi, Jun Ichiro; Kataoka, Satoshi; Hirayama, Hisako; Nunoura, Takuro; Horikoshi, Koki; Sako, Yoshihiko.

In: FEMS microbiology ecology, Vol. 54, No. 1, 01.09.2005, p. 141-155.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Nakagawa, Satoshi ; Takai, Ken ; Inagaki, Fumio ; Chiba, Hitoshi ; Ishibashi, Jun Ichiro ; Kataoka, Satoshi ; Hirayama, Hisako ; Nunoura, Takuro ; Horikoshi, Koki ; Sako, Yoshihiko. / Variability in microbial community and venting chemistry in a sediment-hosted backarc hydrothermal system : Impacts of subseafloor phase-separation. In: FEMS microbiology ecology. 2005 ; Vol. 54, No. 1. pp. 141-155.
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