Variation in woodfuel consumption patterns in response to forest availability in Kampong Thom Province, Cambodia

Neth Top, Nobuya Mizoue, Shigetaka Kai, Toshio Nakao

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

36 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We report details of woodfuel consumption patterns in three different village groupings classified according to population distribution and forest availability. Interview survey data collected from 240 households in 40 villages revealed large differences in woodfuel consumption patterns among the three groups. Areas with lower forest availability were associated with lower per capita woodfuel consumption, proportionately higher consumption of firewood from non-forest sources, greater distances from the village to the woodfuel source, and more species and smaller trees being utilized for firewood. The maximum size of trees used for fuel was 30 cm in diameter, and about 30% of the total woodfuel used was sourced from dead wood. The survey also revealed that some species, such as Xylopia pierrei and Grewia paniculata, were favored for firewood. Respondent's answers revealed a woodfuel deficiency along the major road. While there does not appear to be any evidence that woodfuel consumption is causing deforestation, initiatives to reduce woodfuel consumption are still needed to alleviate these localized supply problems. Woodfuel consumption could be reduced by replacing the traditional "three stone fire" with more efficient types of cooking stove.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)57-68
Number of pages12
JournalBiomass and Bioenergy
Volume27
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 1 2004
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Cambodia
fuelwood
villages
Availability
Population distribution
Deforestation
Stoves
cooking stoves
Cooking
Xylopia
Grewia
Wood
Fires
population distribution
dead wood
deforestation
roads
households
interviews
village

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Forestry
  • Renewable Energy, Sustainability and the Environment
  • Agronomy and Crop Science
  • Waste Management and Disposal

Cite this

Variation in woodfuel consumption patterns in response to forest availability in Kampong Thom Province, Cambodia. / Top, Neth; Mizoue, Nobuya; Kai, Shigetaka; Nakao, Toshio.

In: Biomass and Bioenergy, Vol. 27, No. 1, 01.07.2004, p. 57-68.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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