Vection induced by low-level motion extracted from complex animation films

Wataru Suzuki, Takeharu Seno, Wakayo Yamashita, Noritaka Ichinohe, Hiroshige Takeichi, Stephen Palmisano

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This study examined the contributions of low-, mid- and high-level visual motion information to vection. We compared the vection experiences induced by hand-drawn and computer-generated animation clips to those induced by versions of these movies that contained only their pure optic flow. While the original movies were found to induce longer and stronger vection experiences than the pure optic flow, vection onsets were not significantly altered by removing the mid- and high-level information. We conclude that low-level visual motion information appears to be important for vection induction, whereas mid- and higher-level display information appears to be important for sustaining and strengthening this vection after its initial induction.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)3321-3332
Number of pages12
JournalExperimental Brain Research
Volume237
Issue number12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 1 2019

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Neuroscience(all)

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    Suzuki, W., Seno, T., Yamashita, W., Ichinohe, N., Takeichi, H., & Palmisano, S. (2019). Vection induced by low-level motion extracted from complex animation films. Experimental Brain Research, 237(12), 3321-3332. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00221-019-05674-0