Vector fluid

A vector graphics depiction of surface flow

Ryoichi Ando, Reiji Tsuruno

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We present a simple technique for creating fluid silhouettes described with vector graphics, which we call "Vector Fluid." In our system, a solid region in the fluid is represented as a closed contour and advected by fluid flow to form a curly and clear shape similar to marbling or sumi-nagashi (See Figure 1). The fundamental principle behind our method is that contours of solid regions should not collide. This means that if the initial shape of the region is a concave polygon, that shape should maintain its topology so that it can be rendered as a regular concave polygon, no matter how irregularly the contour is distorted by advection. In contrast to other techniques, our approach explicitly neglects topology changes to track surfaces in a trade off of computational cost and complexity. We also introduce an adaptive contour sampling technique to reduce this extra cost. We explore specific examples in 2D for art oriented usage and show applications and robustness of our method to exhibit organic fluid components. We also demonstrate how to port our entire algorithm onto a GPU to boost interactive performance for complex scenes.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of NPAR 2010
Subtitle of host publicationThe 8th International Symposium on Non-Photorealistic Animation and Rendering
Pages129-135
Number of pages7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 23 2010
Event8th Meeting of the International Symposium on Non-Photorealistic Animation and Rendering, NPAR 2010 - Annecy, France
Duration: Jun 7 2010Jun 10 2010

Other

Other8th Meeting of the International Symposium on Non-Photorealistic Animation and Rendering, NPAR 2010
CountryFrance
CityAnnecy
Period6/7/106/10/10

Fingerprint

Concave polygon
Fluid
Fluids
Topology
Regular polygon
Silhouette
Advection
Fluid Flow
Computational Cost
Costs
Flow of fluids
Figure
Computational Complexity
Trade-offs
Entire
Sampling
Robustness
Closed
Graphics
Demonstrate

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Applied Mathematics
  • Computer Graphics and Computer-Aided Design
  • Computer Science Applications
  • Modelling and Simulation

Cite this

Ando, R., & Tsuruno, R. (2010). Vector fluid: A vector graphics depiction of surface flow. In Proceedings of NPAR 2010: The 8th International Symposium on Non-Photorealistic Animation and Rendering (pp. 129-135) https://doi.org/10.1145/1809939.1809954

Vector fluid : A vector graphics depiction of surface flow. / Ando, Ryoichi; Tsuruno, Reiji.

Proceedings of NPAR 2010: The 8th International Symposium on Non-Photorealistic Animation and Rendering. 2010. p. 129-135.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Ando, R & Tsuruno, R 2010, Vector fluid: A vector graphics depiction of surface flow. in Proceedings of NPAR 2010: The 8th International Symposium on Non-Photorealistic Animation and Rendering. pp. 129-135, 8th Meeting of the International Symposium on Non-Photorealistic Animation and Rendering, NPAR 2010, Annecy, France, 6/7/10. https://doi.org/10.1145/1809939.1809954
Ando R, Tsuruno R. Vector fluid: A vector graphics depiction of surface flow. In Proceedings of NPAR 2010: The 8th International Symposium on Non-Photorealistic Animation and Rendering. 2010. p. 129-135 https://doi.org/10.1145/1809939.1809954
Ando, Ryoichi ; Tsuruno, Reiji. / Vector fluid : A vector graphics depiction of surface flow. Proceedings of NPAR 2010: The 8th International Symposium on Non-Photorealistic Animation and Rendering. 2010. pp. 129-135
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