Vegetable protein intake was inversely associated with cardiovascular mortality in a 15-year follow-up study of the general Japanese population

NIPPON DATA90 Research Group

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Abstract

Aim: To examine the relationship between the intake of dietary vegetable protein and CVD mortality in a 15-year follow-up study of a representative sample of the Japanese population. Methods: A total of 7,744 participants aged 30 years or older (3,224 males and 4,520 females) who were free of CVD at baseline were included in this analysis. Vegetable protein intake (% energy) was assessed using a threeday semi-weighed dietary record at baseline. Multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) were calculated using Cox’s proportional hazards model after adjusting for confounding factors. Results: The total person-years studied were 107,988 with a mean follow-up period of 13.9 years. There were 1,213 deaths during the follow-up period, among which 354 (29.2%) were due to CVD. Vegetable protein intake was associated inversely with CVD and cerebral hemorrhage mortality, with the HRs for a 1% energy increment in vegetable protein intake being 0.86 (95% CI, 0.75-0.99) and 0.58 (95% CI, 0.35-0.95), respectively. In the subgroup analysis of participants with or without hypertension, the inverse association between vegetable protein intake and CVD mortality was more evident in the nonhypertensive group, with the HRs for CVD and stroke being 0.68 (95% CI, 0.50- 0.94) and 0.50 (95% CI, 0.30-0.84), respectively. Conclusions: Vegetable protein intake may prevent future CVD, particularly in nonhypertensive subjects in the Japanese population. However, further studies are necessary to examine the biological mechanisms of this effect.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)198-206
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of atherosclerosis and thrombosis
Volume26
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 2019

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Vegetable Proteins
Chemical vapor deposition
Mortality
Hazards
Population
Diet Records
Dietary Proteins
Cerebral Hemorrhage
Energy Intake
Proportional Hazards Models
Stroke
Hypertension

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Internal Medicine
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Biochemistry, medical

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Vegetable protein intake was inversely associated with cardiovascular mortality in a 15-year follow-up study of the general Japanese population. / NIPPON DATA90 Research Group.

In: Journal of atherosclerosis and thrombosis, Vol. 26, No. 2, 01.01.2019, p. 198-206.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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title = "Vegetable protein intake was inversely associated with cardiovascular mortality in a 15-year follow-up study of the general Japanese population",
abstract = "Aim: To examine the relationship between the intake of dietary vegetable protein and CVD mortality in a 15-year follow-up study of a representative sample of the Japanese population. Methods: A total of 7,744 participants aged 30 years or older (3,224 males and 4,520 females) who were free of CVD at baseline were included in this analysis. Vegetable protein intake ({\%} energy) was assessed using a threeday semi-weighed dietary record at baseline. Multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) were calculated using Cox’s proportional hazards model after adjusting for confounding factors. Results: The total person-years studied were 107,988 with a mean follow-up period of 13.9 years. There were 1,213 deaths during the follow-up period, among which 354 (29.2{\%}) were due to CVD. Vegetable protein intake was associated inversely with CVD and cerebral hemorrhage mortality, with the HRs for a 1{\%} energy increment in vegetable protein intake being 0.86 (95{\%} CI, 0.75-0.99) and 0.58 (95{\%} CI, 0.35-0.95), respectively. In the subgroup analysis of participants with or without hypertension, the inverse association between vegetable protein intake and CVD mortality was more evident in the nonhypertensive group, with the HRs for CVD and stroke being 0.68 (95{\%} CI, 0.50- 0.94) and 0.50 (95{\%} CI, 0.30-0.84), respectively. Conclusions: Vegetable protein intake may prevent future CVD, particularly in nonhypertensive subjects in the Japanese population. However, further studies are necessary to examine the biological mechanisms of this effect.",
author = "{NIPPON DATA90 Research Group} and Ayako Kurihara and Tomonori Okamura and Daisuke Sugiyama and Aya Higashiyama and Makoto Watanabe and Nagako Okuda and Aya Kadota and Naoko Miyagawa and Akira Fujiyoshi and Katsushi Yoshita and Takayoshi Ohkubo and Akira Okayama and Katsuyuki Miura and Hirotsugu Ueshima",
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T1 - Vegetable protein intake was inversely associated with cardiovascular mortality in a 15-year follow-up study of the general Japanese population

AU - NIPPON DATA90 Research Group

AU - Kurihara, Ayako

AU - Okamura, Tomonori

AU - Sugiyama, Daisuke

AU - Higashiyama, Aya

AU - Watanabe, Makoto

AU - Okuda, Nagako

AU - Kadota, Aya

AU - Miyagawa, Naoko

AU - Fujiyoshi, Akira

AU - Yoshita, Katsushi

AU - Ohkubo, Takayoshi

AU - Okayama, Akira

AU - Miura, Katsuyuki

AU - Ueshima, Hirotsugu

PY - 2019/1/1

Y1 - 2019/1/1

N2 - Aim: To examine the relationship between the intake of dietary vegetable protein and CVD mortality in a 15-year follow-up study of a representative sample of the Japanese population. Methods: A total of 7,744 participants aged 30 years or older (3,224 males and 4,520 females) who were free of CVD at baseline were included in this analysis. Vegetable protein intake (% energy) was assessed using a threeday semi-weighed dietary record at baseline. Multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) were calculated using Cox’s proportional hazards model after adjusting for confounding factors. Results: The total person-years studied were 107,988 with a mean follow-up period of 13.9 years. There were 1,213 deaths during the follow-up period, among which 354 (29.2%) were due to CVD. Vegetable protein intake was associated inversely with CVD and cerebral hemorrhage mortality, with the HRs for a 1% energy increment in vegetable protein intake being 0.86 (95% CI, 0.75-0.99) and 0.58 (95% CI, 0.35-0.95), respectively. In the subgroup analysis of participants with or without hypertension, the inverse association between vegetable protein intake and CVD mortality was more evident in the nonhypertensive group, with the HRs for CVD and stroke being 0.68 (95% CI, 0.50- 0.94) and 0.50 (95% CI, 0.30-0.84), respectively. Conclusions: Vegetable protein intake may prevent future CVD, particularly in nonhypertensive subjects in the Japanese population. However, further studies are necessary to examine the biological mechanisms of this effect.

AB - Aim: To examine the relationship between the intake of dietary vegetable protein and CVD mortality in a 15-year follow-up study of a representative sample of the Japanese population. Methods: A total of 7,744 participants aged 30 years or older (3,224 males and 4,520 females) who were free of CVD at baseline were included in this analysis. Vegetable protein intake (% energy) was assessed using a threeday semi-weighed dietary record at baseline. Multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) were calculated using Cox’s proportional hazards model after adjusting for confounding factors. Results: The total person-years studied were 107,988 with a mean follow-up period of 13.9 years. There were 1,213 deaths during the follow-up period, among which 354 (29.2%) were due to CVD. Vegetable protein intake was associated inversely with CVD and cerebral hemorrhage mortality, with the HRs for a 1% energy increment in vegetable protein intake being 0.86 (95% CI, 0.75-0.99) and 0.58 (95% CI, 0.35-0.95), respectively. In the subgroup analysis of participants with or without hypertension, the inverse association between vegetable protein intake and CVD mortality was more evident in the nonhypertensive group, with the HRs for CVD and stroke being 0.68 (95% CI, 0.50- 0.94) and 0.50 (95% CI, 0.30-0.84), respectively. Conclusions: Vegetable protein intake may prevent future CVD, particularly in nonhypertensive subjects in the Japanese population. However, further studies are necessary to examine the biological mechanisms of this effect.

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DO - 10.5551/jat.44172

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EP - 206

JO - Journal of Atherosclerosis and Thrombosis

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SN - 1340-3478

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