Vertical stratification and effects of crown damage on maximum tree height in mixed conifer-broadleaf forests of Yakushima Island, southern Japan

Hiroaki Ishii, Atsushi Takashima, Naoki Makita, Shigejiro Yoshida

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We investigated vertical stratification and effects of crown damage on maximum tree height in two mixed conifer-broadleaf forests in Yakushima Island, southern Japan. In both research plots, the conifer trees dominated the upper canopy while the broadleaved trees dominated the middle to lower canopy. Most broadleaved trees were shorter than the median crown-base height (HCB) of the conifer trees. Estimates of the maximum height (Hmax) of the conifer trees were greater than those of the broadleaved trees. Crown damage had significant negative effects on maximum height of the conifer trees. Crown damage was observed for 72.8-88.7% of the conifer trees, and severe types of damage such as stem breakage and top die-back were the most predominant. The Hmax of the damaged conifer trees was 16-17% shorter than that of the intact trees and as much as 16-28% shorter than the potential maximum height estimated from the diameter-height relationship of the tallest intact trees. We inferred that crown disturbance is an important factor determining the maximum height of the canopy of the two mixed forests. Our results suggested that vertical stratification between conifer and broadleaved trees may be an important mechanism contributing to their coexistence and additive basal area of mixed forests on Yakushima Island.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)27-36
Number of pages10
JournalPlant Ecology
Volume211
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 28 2010

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tree crown
conifers
coniferous tree
stratification
Japan
damage
canopy
mixed forests
mixed forest
effect
hexachlorobenzene
dieback
breakage
basal area
coexistence
stem
disturbance
stems

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Ecology
  • Plant Science

Cite this

Vertical stratification and effects of crown damage on maximum tree height in mixed conifer-broadleaf forests of Yakushima Island, southern Japan. / Ishii, Hiroaki; Takashima, Atsushi; Makita, Naoki; Yoshida, Shigejiro.

In: Plant Ecology, Vol. 211, No. 1, 28.04.2010, p. 27-36.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ishii, Hiroaki ; Takashima, Atsushi ; Makita, Naoki ; Yoshida, Shigejiro. / Vertical stratification and effects of crown damage on maximum tree height in mixed conifer-broadleaf forests of Yakushima Island, southern Japan. In: Plant Ecology. 2010 ; Vol. 211, No. 1. pp. 27-36.
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