Visual and somatic sensory feedback of brain activity for intuitive surgical robot manipulation

Satoshi Miura, Yuya Matsumoto, Yo Kobayashi, Kazuya Kawamura, Yasutaka Nakashima, Masakatsu G. Fujie

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

This paper presents a method to evaluate the hand-eye coordination of the master-slave surgical robot by measuring the activation of the intraparietal sulcus in users brain activity during controlling virtual manipulation. The objective is to examine the changes in activity of the intraparietal sulcus when the user's visual or somatic feedback is passed through or intercepted. The hypothesis is that the intraparietal sulcus activates significantly when both the visual and somatic sense pass feedback, but deactivates when either visual or somatic is intercepted. The brain activity of three subjects was measured by the functional near-infrared spectroscopic-topography brain imaging while they used a hand controller to move a virtual arm of a surgical simulator. The experiment was performed several times with three conditions: (i) the user controlled the virtual arm naturally under both visual and somatic feedback passed, (ii) the user moved with closed eyes under only somatic feedback passed, (iii) the user only gazed at the screen under only visual feedback passed. Brain activity showed significantly better control of the virtual arm naturally (p<0.05) when compared with moving with closed eyes or only gazing among all participants. In conclusion, the brain can activate according to visual and somatic sensory feedback agreement.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publication2015 37th Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, EMBC 2015
PublisherInstitute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc.
Pages17-20
Number of pages4
ISBN (Electronic)9781424492718
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 4 2015
Event37th Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, EMBC 2015 - Milan, Italy
Duration: Aug 25 2015Aug 29 2015

Publication series

NameProceedings of the Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, EMBS
Volume2015-November
ISSN (Print)1557-170X

Other

Other37th Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, EMBC 2015
CountryItaly
CityMilan
Period8/25/158/29/15

Fingerprint

Sensory feedback
Sensory Feedback
Parietal Lobe
Brain
Feedback
Arm
Hand
Neuroimaging
End effectors
Topography
Simulators
Chemical activation
Robotic surgery
Infrared radiation
Imaging techniques
Controllers
Experiments

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Signal Processing
  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition
  • Health Informatics

Cite this

Miura, S., Matsumoto, Y., Kobayashi, Y., Kawamura, K., Nakashima, Y., & Fujie, M. G. (2015). Visual and somatic sensory feedback of brain activity for intuitive surgical robot manipulation. In 2015 37th Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, EMBC 2015 (pp. 17-20). [7318250] (Proceedings of the Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, EMBS; Vol. 2015-November). Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc.. https://doi.org/10.1109/EMBC.2015.7318250

Visual and somatic sensory feedback of brain activity for intuitive surgical robot manipulation. / Miura, Satoshi; Matsumoto, Yuya; Kobayashi, Yo; Kawamura, Kazuya; Nakashima, Yasutaka; Fujie, Masakatsu G.

2015 37th Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, EMBC 2015. Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc., 2015. p. 17-20 7318250 (Proceedings of the Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, EMBS; Vol. 2015-November).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Miura, S, Matsumoto, Y, Kobayashi, Y, Kawamura, K, Nakashima, Y & Fujie, MG 2015, Visual and somatic sensory feedback of brain activity for intuitive surgical robot manipulation. in 2015 37th Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, EMBC 2015., 7318250, Proceedings of the Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, EMBS, vol. 2015-November, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc., pp. 17-20, 37th Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, EMBC 2015, Milan, Italy, 8/25/15. https://doi.org/10.1109/EMBC.2015.7318250
Miura S, Matsumoto Y, Kobayashi Y, Kawamura K, Nakashima Y, Fujie MG. Visual and somatic sensory feedback of brain activity for intuitive surgical robot manipulation. In 2015 37th Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, EMBC 2015. Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc. 2015. p. 17-20. 7318250. (Proceedings of the Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, EMBS). https://doi.org/10.1109/EMBC.2015.7318250
Miura, Satoshi ; Matsumoto, Yuya ; Kobayashi, Yo ; Kawamura, Kazuya ; Nakashima, Yasutaka ; Fujie, Masakatsu G. / Visual and somatic sensory feedback of brain activity for intuitive surgical robot manipulation. 2015 37th Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, EMBC 2015. Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc., 2015. pp. 17-20 (Proceedings of the Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, EMBS).
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