Vitamin D deficiency: A common occurrence in both high-and low-energy fractures

Barbara Steele, Alana Serota, David L. Helfet, Margaret Peterson, Stephen Lyman, Joseph M. Lane

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

As a consequence of newly elevated standards for normal vitamin D levels, there is a renewed interest in vitamin D insufficiency and deficiency (<32 and <20 ng/ml, respectively) in the orthopedic patient population. This study tests the hypothesis that vitamin D insufficiency is comparably prevalent among both high- and low-energy fracture patients. A retrospective analysis of the medical records for 44 orthopedic trauma in-patients with non-vertebral fractures was conducted from June 1, 2006 to February 1, 2007. The obtained data included a 25-hydroxyvitamin D level, age, gender, and reason for admission; high-energy vs. low-energy fracture. Vitamin D insufficiency, 25(OH)D <32 ng/ml, was found in 59.1% of the patients. Significantly, more women (75%) than men (40%) were vitamin D insufficient among all fracture patients and specifically among high-energy fractures, 80% women insufficient vs. 25% men insufficient. In women, both high- and low-energy fractures present with vitamin D insufficiency (80% of high-energy fractures and 71.4% of low-energy fractures). In men, the mean vitamin D level was lower for low-energy fractures (16 ng/ml) compared to high-energy fractures (32 ng/ml). In addition, men with low-energy fractures were significantly older than men with high-energy fractures and women with low-energy fractures were also older. Statistically, more vitamin D insufficiency is seen in women and our results are consistent with the gender difference seen in the general population. Even among younger men who sustain a high-energy fracture, 25% are vitamin D insufficient. Women with fractures regardless of age or fracture energy level have low vitamin D levels. Levels of 25(OH)D should be measured in all orthopedic trauma patients and the American Society for Bone and Mineral Research and National Osteoporosis Foundation currently recommend that vitamin D levels should be corrected.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)143-148
Number of pages6
JournalHSS Journal
Volume4
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 1 2008
Externally publishedYes

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Vitamin D Deficiency
Vitamin D
Orthopedics
Wounds and Injuries
Population
Osteoporosis
Medical Records

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

Cite this

Vitamin D deficiency : A common occurrence in both high-and low-energy fractures. / Steele, Barbara; Serota, Alana; Helfet, David L.; Peterson, Margaret; Lyman, Stephen; Lane, Joseph M.

In: HSS Journal, Vol. 4, No. 2, 01.09.2008, p. 143-148.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Steele, B, Serota, A, Helfet, DL, Peterson, M, Lyman, S & Lane, JM 2008, 'Vitamin D deficiency: A common occurrence in both high-and low-energy fractures', HSS Journal, vol. 4, no. 2, pp. 143-148. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11420-008-9083-6
Steele, Barbara ; Serota, Alana ; Helfet, David L. ; Peterson, Margaret ; Lyman, Stephen ; Lane, Joseph M. / Vitamin D deficiency : A common occurrence in both high-and low-energy fractures. In: HSS Journal. 2008 ; Vol. 4, No. 2. pp. 143-148.
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