Waist circumference is the main determinant of elevated C-reactive protein in metabolic syndrome

Hirofumi Nakamura, Hiroyuki Ito, Yuhko Egami, Yoshikazu Kaji, Toru Maruyama, George Koike, Sumie Jingu, Mine Harada

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Background: Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is known to increase the risk of cardiovascular disease. C-reactive protein (CRP) has been reported to be elevated in subjects with MetS. However, which component of MetS contributes mostly to the elevation has not been studied in detail. Methods: We studied 628 apparently healthy Japanese subjects (men 262, women 366, age 19-85 years). Body mass index, waist circumference (WC), blood pressure, lipids, glucose, insulin and CRP were measured. MetS was defined according to the National Cholesterol Education Program's Adult Treatment Panel III report. Results: In partial correlation analysis, WC showed the strongest correlation with CRP among the variables related to MetS. CRP increased as the number of MetS components increased. The mean CRP value adjusted for demographic variables was higher in subjects with MetS than those without MetS, and further adjustments with variables related to MetS revealed that the significant difference between the two groups disappeared only when further adjustment was made for WC. In multiple linear regression analysis, the independent variable that most strongly explained the CRP level was WC, which was followed by HDL-cholesterol. Finally, comparison of the CRP levels in groups stratified by abdominal obesity and the number of MetS components revealed that those with abdominal obesity tended to show higher CRP levels compared with those without abdominal obesity regardless of the number of MetS components other than WC. Conclusions: Subjects with MetS showed higher levels of CRP and the main determinant of the CRP elevation was WC.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)330-336
Number of pages7
JournalDiabetes Research and Clinical Practice
Volume79
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 1 2008

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Waist Circumference
C-Reactive Protein
Abdominal Obesity
HDL Cholesterol
Linear Models
Healthy Volunteers
Body Mass Index
Cardiovascular Diseases
Cholesterol
Regression Analysis
Demography
Insulin
Blood Pressure
Lipids
Education
Glucose

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Internal Medicine
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Endocrinology

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Waist circumference is the main determinant of elevated C-reactive protein in metabolic syndrome. / Nakamura, Hirofumi; Ito, Hiroyuki; Egami, Yuhko; Kaji, Yoshikazu; Maruyama, Toru; Koike, George; Jingu, Sumie; Harada, Mine.

In: Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice, Vol. 79, No. 2, 01.02.2008, p. 330-336.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Nakamura, Hirofumi ; Ito, Hiroyuki ; Egami, Yuhko ; Kaji, Yoshikazu ; Maruyama, Toru ; Koike, George ; Jingu, Sumie ; Harada, Mine. / Waist circumference is the main determinant of elevated C-reactive protein in metabolic syndrome. In: Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice. 2008 ; Vol. 79, No. 2. pp. 330-336.
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