Well-developed gall tissues protecting the gall wasp, Andricus Mukaigawae (Mukaigawa) (Hymenoptera: Cynipidae) against the gall-inhabiting moth, Oedematopoda sp. (Lepidoptera: Stathmopodidae)

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Abstract

Gall parasitism by moth larvae in the unisexual galls produced by Andricus mukaigawae (MUKAIGAWA) on Quercus serrata THUNB. in Nose, Osaka, Japan, was surveyed by dissection of the galls. Almost all moth larvae found in the galls were Oedematopoda sp. This is the first record of this genus from insect galls. Overall, 53.4% of A. mukaigawae galls examined were attacked by the moths, but A. mukaigawae larvae were fed on by moth larvae in 12.7% or less of the galls examined. Larval feeding habits of Oedematopoda sp. were examined under laboratory conditions. The moth larvae were able to feed on Q. serrata leaves, but preferred unisexual galls of A. mukaigawae. Furthermore, almost all larvae tested fed on artificially exposed larvae or pupae of A. mukaigawae or larvae of Synergus japonicus WALKER, although the results of gall dissection indicate that the moth larvae were usually cecidophages and seldom became predators of the gall-formers or inquiline gall wasps under natural conditions. Thus, the well-developed parenchymatous tissues surrounding the sclerenchymas protect the gall-formers or inquiline gall wasps in A. mukaigawae galls from attack by moths.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)135-141
Number of pages7
JournalApplied Entomology and Zoology
Volume32
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 1997
Externally publishedYes

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Insect Science

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