XVI. Future of mushroom production and biotechnology

Shoji Ohga, Yutaka Kitamoto

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Mushroom production is one of the few large-scale commercial applications of microbial technology for bioconversion of agricultural and forestry waste materials to valuable foods. The annual world production of cultivated mushrooms has recently exceeded 4 million tons. Many new methods for production and processing are being developed. Fundamental knowledge is being developed with mushroom physiology research in the studies of various factors affecting mycelium and fruit body development. Lignocellosic materials are the main substrates for mushroom production. Improvement of lignocellose degradation abilities of new mushroom strains, developed by applications of molecular biology, may result in higher efficiencies in production of fruit bodies.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)461-469
Number of pages9
JournalFood Reviews International
Volume13
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 1997

Fingerprint

mushroom growing
Agaricales
Biotechnology
mushrooms
biotechnology
fruiting bodies
Fruits
biotransformation
Fruit
molecular biology
mycelium
forestry
physiology
Forestry
Bioconversion
Molecular biology
Mycelium
Physiology
degradation
Molecular Biology

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Food Science
  • Chemical Engineering(all)

Cite this

XVI. Future of mushroom production and biotechnology. / Ohga, Shoji; Kitamoto, Yutaka.

In: Food Reviews International, Vol. 13, No. 3, 01.01.1997, p. 461-469.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ohga, Shoji ; Kitamoto, Yutaka. / XVI. Future of mushroom production and biotechnology. In: Food Reviews International. 1997 ; Vol. 13, No. 3. pp. 461-469.
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