Alexithymia and chronic pain: The role of negative affectivity

Seiko Makino, Mark P. Jensen, Tatsuyuki Arimura, Tetsuji Obata, Kozo Anno, Rie Iwaki, Chiharu Kubo, Nobuyuki Sudo, Masako Hosoi

研究成果: ジャーナルへの寄稿記事

17 引用 (Scopus)

抄録

OBJECTIVES:: Alexithymia has been shown to be associated with key pain-related variables in persons with chronic pain from western countries, but the generalizability of these findings across cultures has not been examined adequately. Also, there remain questions regarding the importance of alexithymia to patient functioning over and above the effects of the general negative affectivity. METHODS:: Alexithymia, pain intensity, pain interference, depression, anxiety, and pain catastrophizing were measured in 128 Japanese patients with chronic pain. Because of the low internal consistency coefficients for 2 of the alexithymia scales (measuring difficulty describing feelings and externally oriented feelings) in our sample, we limited our analyses to a scale assessing difficulty identifying feelings and the total alexithymia scale score. RESULTS:: Although the 20-item Toronto Alexithymia Scale total and the Difficulty Identifying Feelings scale scores were not significantly associated with pain intensity, these scales were associated with pain interference, catastrophizing, and negative affectivity in our sample. However, these associations became nonsignificant when measures of negative affectivity were controlled. DISCUSSION:: The findings support the cross-cultural generalizability of significant associations between alexithymia and both pain interference and catastrophizing. However, whether (1) alexithymia influences patient functioning indirectly by its effects on negative affect or (2) the univariate associations found between alexithymia and measures of patient functioning are a byproduct of both being influenced by negative affect needs to be tested using longitudinal and experimental research.

元の言語英語
ページ(範囲)354-361
ページ数8
ジャーナルClinical Journal of Pain
29
発行部数4
DOI
出版物ステータス出版済み - 4 1 2013

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Affective Symptoms
Chronic Pain
Catastrophization
Emotions
Pain
Anxiety
Depression

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine

これを引用

Alexithymia and chronic pain : The role of negative affectivity. / Makino, Seiko; Jensen, Mark P.; Arimura, Tatsuyuki; Obata, Tetsuji; Anno, Kozo; Iwaki, Rie; Kubo, Chiharu; Sudo, Nobuyuki; Hosoi, Masako.

:: Clinical Journal of Pain, 巻 29, 番号 4, 01.04.2013, p. 354-361.

研究成果: ジャーナルへの寄稿記事

Makino, Seiko ; Jensen, Mark P. ; Arimura, Tatsuyuki ; Obata, Tetsuji ; Anno, Kozo ; Iwaki, Rie ; Kubo, Chiharu ; Sudo, Nobuyuki ; Hosoi, Masako. / Alexithymia and chronic pain : The role of negative affectivity. :: Clinical Journal of Pain. 2013 ; 巻 29, 番号 4. pp. 354-361.
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