Arousing emoticons edit stream/bounce perception of objects moving past each other

Akihiko Gobara, Naoto Yoshimura, Yuki Yamada

研究成果: ジャーナルへの寄稿記事

抄録

When two identical objects move toward each other, overlap completely, and continue toward opposite ends of a space, observers might perceive them as streaming through or bouncing off each other. This phenomenon is known as 'stream/bounce perception'. In this study, we investigated the effect of the presentation of emoticons on stream/bounce perception in five experiments. In Experiment 1, we used emoticons representing anger ('('^')'), a smile ('(^-^)'), and a sober face ('(°-°)', as a control), and observers were asked to judge whether two objects unrelated to the emoticon had streamed through or bounced off each other. The anger emoticon biased perception toward bouncing when compared with the smile or sober face emoticon. In Experiments 2 and 3, we controlled for the valence and arousal of emoticons, and found that arousal influenced stream/bounce perception but valence did not. Experiments 4 and 5 ruled out the possibility of attentional capture and response bias for the emoticon with higher arousal. Taken together, the findings indicate that emoticons with higher arousal evoke a mental image of a 'collision' in observers, thereby eliciting the bounce perception.

元の言語英語
記事番号5752
ジャーナルScientific reports
8
発行部数1
DOI
出版物ステータス出版済み - 12 1 2018

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • General

これを引用

Arousing emoticons edit stream/bounce perception of objects moving past each other. / Gobara, Akihiko; Yoshimura, Naoto; Yamada, Yuki.

:: Scientific reports, 巻 8, 番号 1, 5752, 01.12.2018.

研究成果: ジャーナルへの寄稿記事

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