Auditory sensory gating to the human voice: A preliminary MEG study

Yoji Hirano, Toshiaki Onitsuka, Toshihide Kuroki, Yuji Matsuki, Shogo Hirano, Toshihiko Maekawa, Shigenobu Kanba

研究成果: ジャーナルへの寄稿記事

4 引用 (Scopus)

抄録

The ability of the brain to suppress incoming irrelevant sensory input is termed 'sensory gating,' and auditory sensory gating is often indexed by the auditory evoked response. We recorded the auditory evoked magnetic fields to the human voice, using the conditioning-testing paradigm, to investigate whether or not healthy subjects show less activation to the second voice stimulus. Seventeen healthy adults (mean age 27.9 ± 4.8 years, 9 males and 8 females) participated in the experiment. The auditory stimuli were presented monaurally as a series of 120 paired voices, with 500-ms interstimulus intervals and 6-s interpaired stimulus intervals. The P50m and the N100m responses were investigated, and dipole source localization was performed. Root mean squares of both P50m and N100m were significantly suppressed to the second stimulus bilaterally, and the suppression was more significant in N100m. The N100m was located significantly more laterally than the P50m for both hemispheres. These results therefore demonstrate the presence of sensory gating for auditory inputs of the human voice in the primary auditory cortex and the auditory association area.

元の言語英語
ページ(範囲)260-269
ページ数10
ジャーナルPsychiatry Research - Neuroimaging
163
発行部数3
DOI
出版物ステータス出版済み - 8 30 2008

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Sensory Gating
Auditory Cortex
Auditory Evoked Potentials
Magnetic Fields
Healthy Volunteers
Brain

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Neuroscience (miscellaneous)
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

これを引用

Auditory sensory gating to the human voice : A preliminary MEG study. / Hirano, Yoji; Onitsuka, Toshiaki; Kuroki, Toshihide; Matsuki, Yuji; Hirano, Shogo; Maekawa, Toshihiko; Kanba, Shigenobu.

:: Psychiatry Research - Neuroimaging, 巻 163, 番号 3, 30.08.2008, p. 260-269.

研究成果: ジャーナルへの寄稿記事

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