Aversive Learning in the Praying Mantis (Tenodera aridifolia), a Sit and Wait Predator

Thomas Carle, Rio Horiwaki, Anya Hurlbert, Yoshifumi Yamawaki

研究成果: ジャーナルへの寄稿記事

抄録

Animals learn to associate sensory cues with the palatability of food in order to avoid bitterness in food (a common sign of toxicity). Associations are important for active foraging predators to avoid unpalatable prey and to invest energy in searching for palatable prey only. However, it has been suggested that sit-and-wait predators might rely on the opportunity that palatable prey approach them by chance: the most efficient strategy could be to catch every available prey and then decide whether to ingest them or not. In the present study, we investigated avoidance learning in a sit-and-wait predator, the praying mantis (Tenodera aridifolia). To examine the effects of conspicuousness and novelty of prey on avoidance learning, we used three different prey species: mealworms (novel prey), honeybees (novel prey with conspicuous signals) and crickets (familiar prey). We sequentially presented the prey species in pairs and made one of them artificially bitter. In the absence of bitterness, the mantises consumed bees and crickets more frequently than mealworms. When the prey were made bitter, the mantises still continued to attack bitter crickets as expected. However, they reduced their attacks on bitter mealworms more than on bitter bees. This contrasts with the fact that conspicuous signals (e.g. coloration in bees) facilitate avoidance learning in active foraging predators. Surprisingly, we found that the bitter bees were totally rejected after an attack whereas bitter mealworms were partially eaten (~35%). Our results highlight the fact that the mantises might maintain a selection pressure on bees, and perhaps on aposematic species in general.

元の言語英語
ページ(範囲)158-175
ページ数18
ジャーナルJournal of Insect Behavior
31
発行部数2
DOI
出版物ステータス出版済み - 3 1 2018

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Tenodera aridifolia
Mantis
bee
Apoidea
learning
predator
cricket
predators
Gryllidae
bitterness
foraging
palatability
food
honeybee
honey bees
toxicity
color
animal
energy

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Insect Science

これを引用

Aversive Learning in the Praying Mantis (Tenodera aridifolia), a Sit and Wait Predator. / Carle, Thomas; Horiwaki, Rio; Hurlbert, Anya; Yamawaki, Yoshifumi.

:: Journal of Insect Behavior, 巻 31, 番号 2, 01.03.2018, p. 158-175.

研究成果: ジャーナルへの寄稿記事

Carle, Thomas ; Horiwaki, Rio ; Hurlbert, Anya ; Yamawaki, Yoshifumi. / Aversive Learning in the Praying Mantis (Tenodera aridifolia), a Sit and Wait Predator. :: Journal of Insect Behavior. 2018 ; 巻 31, 番号 2. pp. 158-175.
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