Bacterial community shift for monitoring the co-composting of oil palm empty fruit bunch and palm oil mill effluent anaerobic sludge

Mohd Huzairi Mohd Zainudin, Norhayati Ramli, Mohd Ali Hassan, Yoshihito Shirai, Kosuke Tashiro, Kenji Sakai, Yukihiro Tashiro

研究成果: ジャーナルへの寄稿記事

7 引用 (Scopus)

抄録

A recently developed rapid co-composting of oil palm empty fruit bunch (OPEFB) and palm oil mill effluent (POME) anaerobic sludge is beginning to attract attention from the palm oil industry in managing the disposal of these wastes. However, a deeper understanding of microbial diversity is required for the sustainable practice of the co-compositing process. In this study, an in-depth assessment of bacterial community succession at different stages of the pilot scale co-composting of OPEFB-POME anaerobic sludge was performed using 454-pyrosequencing, which was then correlated with the changes of physicochemical properties including temperature, oxygen level and moisture content. Approximately 58,122 of 16S rRNA gene amplicons with more than 500 operational taxonomy units (OTUs) were obtained. Alpha diversity and principal component analysis (PCoA) indicated that bacterial diversity and distributions were most influenced by the physicochemical properties of the co-composting stages, which showed remarkable shifts of dominant species throughout the process. Species related to Devosia yakushimensis and Desemzia incerta are shown to emerge as dominant bacteria in the thermophilic stage, while Planococcus rifietoensis correlated best with the later stage of co-composting. This study proved the bacterial community shifts in the co-composting stages corresponded with the changes of the physicochemical properties, and may, therefore, be useful in monitoring the progress of co-composting and compost maturity.

元の言語英語
ページ(範囲)869-877
ページ数9
ジャーナルJournal of Industrial Microbiology and Biotechnology
44
発行部数6
DOI
出版物ステータス出版済み - 6 1 2017

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Composting
Palm oil
Sewage sludge
Sewage
Fruits
Effluents
Fruit
Oils
Monitoring
Principal Component Analysis
rRNA Genes
Industry
Soil
Oxygen
Bacteria
Temperature
Taxonomies
Waste disposal
Principal component analysis
palm oil

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biotechnology
  • Bioengineering
  • Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology

これを引用

Bacterial community shift for monitoring the co-composting of oil palm empty fruit bunch and palm oil mill effluent anaerobic sludge. / Zainudin, Mohd Huzairi Mohd; Ramli, Norhayati; Hassan, Mohd Ali; Shirai, Yoshihito; Tashiro, Kosuke; Sakai, Kenji; Tashiro, Yukihiro.

:: Journal of Industrial Microbiology and Biotechnology, 巻 44, 番号 6, 01.06.2017, p. 869-877.

研究成果: ジャーナルへの寄稿記事

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