Body mass index and disease-specific mortality in an 80-year-old population at the 12-year follow-up

Yutaka Takata, Toshihiro Ansai, Inho Soh, Shuji Awano, Ikuo Nakamichi, Sumio Akifusa, Kenichi Goto, Akihiro Yoshida, Hiroki Fujii, Ritsuko Fujisawa, Kazuo Sonoki

研究成果: ジャーナルへの寄稿記事

6 引用 (Scopus)

抄録

Although many investigations examined the relationship between body mass index (BMI) and mortality, little is known about the possible associations between BMI and disease-specific mortality in very elderly people. Here we evaluated this association in an 80-year-old population. In 1998, 675 residents in Japan's Fukuoka Prefecture participated. They were followed up for 12 years after the baseline examination; 37 subjects (5.5%) were lost to follow-up. The subjects were divided into six groups by their BMI values: <19.5 (most-thin), 19.5 to <21.1 (relatively thin), 21.1 to <22.5 (thin/normal), 22.5 to <23.8 (normal/overweight), 23.8 to <26.0 (relatively obese), ≥26.0 (most-obese). The most-thin group had the highest mortality from all-causes, and from respiratory disease. The normal/overweight group had the lowest overall mortality among the six BMI groups. These associations were found in the men, but not in the women. The most-obese group did not have higher mortality from all-causes or cardiovascular disease compared to the normal/overweight group. Respiratory disease-related mortality was lowest in the most-obese group. No association was found between BMI group and mortality from cancer. In conclusion, in an 80-year-old Japanese population, mortality from all-causes or respiratory disease was highest in the most-lean group (BMI <19.5), and mortality from all-causes or cardiovascular disease was lowest in the group with BMI 22.5 to <23.8.

元の言語英語
ページ(範囲)46-53
ページ数8
ジャーナルArchives of Gerontology and Geriatrics
57
発行部数1
DOI
出版物ステータス出版済み - 7 1 2013
外部発表Yes

Fingerprint

Body Mass Index
mortality
Disease
Mortality
Population
Group
cause
Cardiovascular Diseases
Lost to Follow-Up
Japan
cancer
resident
examination
Neoplasms
Values

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Health(social science)
  • Ageing
  • Gerontology
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology

これを引用

Body mass index and disease-specific mortality in an 80-year-old population at the 12-year follow-up. / Takata, Yutaka; Ansai, Toshihiro; Soh, Inho; Awano, Shuji; Nakamichi, Ikuo; Akifusa, Sumio; Goto, Kenichi; Yoshida, Akihiro; Fujii, Hiroki; Fujisawa, Ritsuko; Sonoki, Kazuo.

:: Archives of Gerontology and Geriatrics, 巻 57, 番号 1, 01.07.2013, p. 46-53.

研究成果: ジャーナルへの寄稿記事

Takata, Y, Ansai, T, Soh, I, Awano, S, Nakamichi, I, Akifusa, S, Goto, K, Yoshida, A, Fujii, H, Fujisawa, R & Sonoki, K 2013, 'Body mass index and disease-specific mortality in an 80-year-old population at the 12-year follow-up', Archives of Gerontology and Geriatrics, 巻. 57, 番号 1, pp. 46-53. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.archger.2013.02.006
Takata, Yutaka ; Ansai, Toshihiro ; Soh, Inho ; Awano, Shuji ; Nakamichi, Ikuo ; Akifusa, Sumio ; Goto, Kenichi ; Yoshida, Akihiro ; Fujii, Hiroki ; Fujisawa, Ritsuko ; Sonoki, Kazuo. / Body mass index and disease-specific mortality in an 80-year-old population at the 12-year follow-up. :: Archives of Gerontology and Geriatrics. 2013 ; 巻 57, 番号 1. pp. 46-53.
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AU - Nakamichi, Ikuo

AU - Akifusa, Sumio

AU - Goto, Kenichi

AU - Yoshida, Akihiro

AU - Fujii, Hiroki

AU - Fujisawa, Ritsuko

AU - Sonoki, Kazuo

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