Circulating odd-chain saturated fatty acids were associated with arteriosclerosis among patients with diabetes, dyslipidemia, or hypertension in Sri Lanka but not Japan

Kayo Kurotani, Palitha Karunapema, Kapila Jayaratne, Masao Sato, Takuya Hayashi, Hiroshi Kajio, Shoji Fukuda, Hisao Hara, Osamu Okazaki, Achala Upendra Jayatilleke, Daisuke Nonaka, Mitsuhiko Noda, Tetsuya Mizoue

研究成果: ジャーナルへの寄稿記事

1 引用 (Scopus)

抄録

The differences in the morbidity and mortality of cardiovascular diseases between Sri Lankan and Japanese populations might be explained by the differences in their diet, especially fat. To test the hypothesis that the fatty acid (FA) compositions differ between Sri Lankan and Japanese populations and that high concentrations of n-3 polyunsaturated FAs and linoleic acid are associated with a low level of arteriosclerosis, the authors compared the circulating FA compositions between Sri Lankan and Japanese populations and examined the association of the circulating FA composition with arterial stiffness in each population. The study participants were patients with diabetes, dyslipidemia, or hypertension in Sri Lanka (n = 100) or Japan (n = 236). Serum FA compositions were measured by gas chromatography. Arterial stiffness was measured using the cardio-ankle vascular index (CAVI). Analysis of covariance was used to compare the FA compositions between the populations. Multiple regression was used to assess the association between each FA and CAVI levels. The concentrations of myristic, γ-linolenic, dihomo-γ-linolenic, and arachidonic acids were higher in the Sri Lankan patients than in the Japanese patients. In contrast, the concentrations of linoleic, α-linolenic, and eicosapentaenoic acids were higher in the Japanese patients than in the Sri Lankan patients. Although no associations of n-3 polyunsaturated FAs and linoleic acid with CAVI were observed in both patient populations, odd-chain saturated FAs (pentadecanoic and heptadecanoic acids) were significantly inversely associated with CAVI levels in the Sri Lankan (P for trend =.03) but not the Japanese patients. The odd-chain saturated FAs might be inversely associated with atherosclerosis in this Sri Lankan population.

元の言語英語
ページ(範囲)82-93
ページ数12
ジャーナルNutrition Research
50
DOI
出版物ステータス出版済み - 2 1 2018

Fingerprint

Sri Lanka
Arteriosclerosis
Dyslipidemias
Japan
Fatty Acids
Hypertension
Ankle
Blood Vessels
Population
Linolenic Acids
Vascular Stiffness
Linoleic Acid
Arachidonic Acids
Gas Chromatography
Atherosclerosis
Cardiovascular Diseases
Fats
Diet
Morbidity
Mortality

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Endocrinology
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

これを引用

Circulating odd-chain saturated fatty acids were associated with arteriosclerosis among patients with diabetes, dyslipidemia, or hypertension in Sri Lanka but not Japan. / Kurotani, Kayo; Karunapema, Palitha; Jayaratne, Kapila; Sato, Masao; Hayashi, Takuya; Kajio, Hiroshi; Fukuda, Shoji; Hara, Hisao; Okazaki, Osamu; Jayatilleke, Achala Upendra; Nonaka, Daisuke; Noda, Mitsuhiko; Mizoue, Tetsuya.

:: Nutrition Research, 巻 50, 01.02.2018, p. 82-93.

研究成果: ジャーナルへの寄稿記事

Kurotani, K, Karunapema, P, Jayaratne, K, Sato, M, Hayashi, T, Kajio, H, Fukuda, S, Hara, H, Okazaki, O, Jayatilleke, AU, Nonaka, D, Noda, M & Mizoue, T 2018, 'Circulating odd-chain saturated fatty acids were associated with arteriosclerosis among patients with diabetes, dyslipidemia, or hypertension in Sri Lanka but not Japan', Nutrition Research, 巻. 50, pp. 82-93. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.nutres.2017.12.004
Kurotani, Kayo ; Karunapema, Palitha ; Jayaratne, Kapila ; Sato, Masao ; Hayashi, Takuya ; Kajio, Hiroshi ; Fukuda, Shoji ; Hara, Hisao ; Okazaki, Osamu ; Jayatilleke, Achala Upendra ; Nonaka, Daisuke ; Noda, Mitsuhiko ; Mizoue, Tetsuya. / Circulating odd-chain saturated fatty acids were associated with arteriosclerosis among patients with diabetes, dyslipidemia, or hypertension in Sri Lanka but not Japan. :: Nutrition Research. 2018 ; 巻 50. pp. 82-93.
@article{bf81e8a9df614a63a713c6e8eb62bcb4,
title = "Circulating odd-chain saturated fatty acids were associated with arteriosclerosis among patients with diabetes, dyslipidemia, or hypertension in Sri Lanka but not Japan",
abstract = "The differences in the morbidity and mortality of cardiovascular diseases between Sri Lankan and Japanese populations might be explained by the differences in their diet, especially fat. To test the hypothesis that the fatty acid (FA) compositions differ between Sri Lankan and Japanese populations and that high concentrations of n-3 polyunsaturated FAs and linoleic acid are associated with a low level of arteriosclerosis, the authors compared the circulating FA compositions between Sri Lankan and Japanese populations and examined the association of the circulating FA composition with arterial stiffness in each population. The study participants were patients with diabetes, dyslipidemia, or hypertension in Sri Lanka (n = 100) or Japan (n = 236). Serum FA compositions were measured by gas chromatography. Arterial stiffness was measured using the cardio-ankle vascular index (CAVI). Analysis of covariance was used to compare the FA compositions between the populations. Multiple regression was used to assess the association between each FA and CAVI levels. The concentrations of myristic, γ-linolenic, dihomo-γ-linolenic, and arachidonic acids were higher in the Sri Lankan patients than in the Japanese patients. In contrast, the concentrations of linoleic, α-linolenic, and eicosapentaenoic acids were higher in the Japanese patients than in the Sri Lankan patients. Although no associations of n-3 polyunsaturated FAs and linoleic acid with CAVI were observed in both patient populations, odd-chain saturated FAs (pentadecanoic and heptadecanoic acids) were significantly inversely associated with CAVI levels in the Sri Lankan (P for trend =.03) but not the Japanese patients. The odd-chain saturated FAs might be inversely associated with atherosclerosis in this Sri Lankan population.",
author = "Kayo Kurotani and Palitha Karunapema and Kapila Jayaratne and Masao Sato and Takuya Hayashi and Hiroshi Kajio and Shoji Fukuda and Hisao Hara and Osamu Okazaki and Jayatilleke, {Achala Upendra} and Daisuke Nonaka and Mitsuhiko Noda and Tetsuya Mizoue",
year = "2018",
month = "2",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.nutres.2017.12.004",
language = "English",
volume = "50",
pages = "82--93",
journal = "Nutrition Research",
issn = "0271-5317",
publisher = "Elsevier Inc.",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Circulating odd-chain saturated fatty acids were associated with arteriosclerosis among patients with diabetes, dyslipidemia, or hypertension in Sri Lanka but not Japan

AU - Kurotani, Kayo

AU - Karunapema, Palitha

AU - Jayaratne, Kapila

AU - Sato, Masao

AU - Hayashi, Takuya

AU - Kajio, Hiroshi

AU - Fukuda, Shoji

AU - Hara, Hisao

AU - Okazaki, Osamu

AU - Jayatilleke, Achala Upendra

AU - Nonaka, Daisuke

AU - Noda, Mitsuhiko

AU - Mizoue, Tetsuya

PY - 2018/2/1

Y1 - 2018/2/1

N2 - The differences in the morbidity and mortality of cardiovascular diseases between Sri Lankan and Japanese populations might be explained by the differences in their diet, especially fat. To test the hypothesis that the fatty acid (FA) compositions differ between Sri Lankan and Japanese populations and that high concentrations of n-3 polyunsaturated FAs and linoleic acid are associated with a low level of arteriosclerosis, the authors compared the circulating FA compositions between Sri Lankan and Japanese populations and examined the association of the circulating FA composition with arterial stiffness in each population. The study participants were patients with diabetes, dyslipidemia, or hypertension in Sri Lanka (n = 100) or Japan (n = 236). Serum FA compositions were measured by gas chromatography. Arterial stiffness was measured using the cardio-ankle vascular index (CAVI). Analysis of covariance was used to compare the FA compositions between the populations. Multiple regression was used to assess the association between each FA and CAVI levels. The concentrations of myristic, γ-linolenic, dihomo-γ-linolenic, and arachidonic acids were higher in the Sri Lankan patients than in the Japanese patients. In contrast, the concentrations of linoleic, α-linolenic, and eicosapentaenoic acids were higher in the Japanese patients than in the Sri Lankan patients. Although no associations of n-3 polyunsaturated FAs and linoleic acid with CAVI were observed in both patient populations, odd-chain saturated FAs (pentadecanoic and heptadecanoic acids) were significantly inversely associated with CAVI levels in the Sri Lankan (P for trend =.03) but not the Japanese patients. The odd-chain saturated FAs might be inversely associated with atherosclerosis in this Sri Lankan population.

AB - The differences in the morbidity and mortality of cardiovascular diseases between Sri Lankan and Japanese populations might be explained by the differences in their diet, especially fat. To test the hypothesis that the fatty acid (FA) compositions differ between Sri Lankan and Japanese populations and that high concentrations of n-3 polyunsaturated FAs and linoleic acid are associated with a low level of arteriosclerosis, the authors compared the circulating FA compositions between Sri Lankan and Japanese populations and examined the association of the circulating FA composition with arterial stiffness in each population. The study participants were patients with diabetes, dyslipidemia, or hypertension in Sri Lanka (n = 100) or Japan (n = 236). Serum FA compositions were measured by gas chromatography. Arterial stiffness was measured using the cardio-ankle vascular index (CAVI). Analysis of covariance was used to compare the FA compositions between the populations. Multiple regression was used to assess the association between each FA and CAVI levels. The concentrations of myristic, γ-linolenic, dihomo-γ-linolenic, and arachidonic acids were higher in the Sri Lankan patients than in the Japanese patients. In contrast, the concentrations of linoleic, α-linolenic, and eicosapentaenoic acids were higher in the Japanese patients than in the Sri Lankan patients. Although no associations of n-3 polyunsaturated FAs and linoleic acid with CAVI were observed in both patient populations, odd-chain saturated FAs (pentadecanoic and heptadecanoic acids) were significantly inversely associated with CAVI levels in the Sri Lankan (P for trend =.03) but not the Japanese patients. The odd-chain saturated FAs might be inversely associated with atherosclerosis in this Sri Lankan population.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85040314694&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85040314694&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.nutres.2017.12.004

DO - 10.1016/j.nutres.2017.12.004

M3 - Article

VL - 50

SP - 82

EP - 93

JO - Nutrition Research

JF - Nutrition Research

SN - 0271-5317

ER -