Comparison of feature vector compositions to enhance the performance of NIRS-BCI-triggered robotic hand orthosis for post-stroke motor recovery

Jongseung Lee, Nobutaka Mukae, Jumpei Arata, Koji Iihara, Makoto Hashizume

研究成果: ジャーナルへの寄稿記事

1 引用 (Scopus)

抄録

Recently, brain-computer interfaces, combined with feedback systems and goal-oriented training, have been investigated for their capacity to promote functional recovery after stroke. Accordingly, we developed a brain-computer interface-triggered robotic hand orthosis that assists hand-closing and hand-opening for post-stroke patients without sufficient motor output. In this system, near-infrared spectroscopy is used to monitor the affected motor cortex, and a linear discriminant analysis-based binary classifier estimates hand posture. The estimated posture then wirelessly triggers the robotic hand orthosis. For better performance of the brain-computer interface, we tested feature windows of different lengths and varying feature vector compositions with motor execution data from seven neurologically intact participants. The interaction between a feature window and a delay in the hemodynamic response significantly affected both classification accuracy (Matthew Correlation Coefficient) and detection latency. The 'preserving channels' feature vector was able to increase accuracy by 13.14% and decrease latency by 29.48%, relative to averaging. Oxyhemoglobin combined with deoxyhemoglobin improved accuracy by 3.71% and decreased latency by 6.01% relative to oxyhemoglobin alone. Thus, the best classification performance resulted in an accuracy of 0.7154 and a latency of 2.8515 s. The hand rehabilitation system was successfully implemented using this feature vector composition, which yielded better classification performance.

元の言語英語
記事番号3845
ジャーナルApplied Sciences (Switzerland)
9
発行部数18
DOI
出版物ステータス出版済み - 9 1 2019

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end effectors
End effectors
strokes
Brain computer interface
recovery
oxyhemoglobin
brain
posture
Recovery
Oxyhemoglobins
Chemical analysis
correlation detection
hemodynamic responses
Near infrared spectroscopy
cortexes
Hemodynamics
Discriminant analysis
closing
classifiers
correlation coefficients

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Materials Science(all)
  • Instrumentation
  • Engineering(all)
  • Process Chemistry and Technology
  • Computer Science Applications
  • Fluid Flow and Transfer Processes

これを引用

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AU - Mukae, Nobutaka

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AU - Iihara, Koji

AU - Hashizume, Makoto

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