Comparison of recovery in pediatric patients: a retrospective study

研究成果: ジャーナルへの寄稿記事

抄録

Objective: The recovery after general anesthesia is influenced by the choice of inhalational agent. Stimulations might make patient’s agitate. However, the recovery using no touch technique might be safer. In this study, we compared the recovery time, awakening end-tidal concentration, and respiratory complications among inhalational anesthetics in pediatric patients using no touch technique, retrospectively. Material and methods: The subjects were pediatric patients aged 3 months to 11 years under general anesthesia using sevoflurane, isoflurane, or desflurane. Background, awakening end-tidal concentration, respiratory complications, the time of eye open, body movement, and extubation were recorded. Results: A total of 170 patients were included in the study. There were no respiratory complications during emergence. Awakening end-tidal concentration in desflurane was 0.98%, sevoflurane (0.39%), and isoflurane (0.25%). In patients received desflurane, the time of body movement, eye open, and extubation were significantly shorter than patients who received other anesthetics (p < 0.05). Conclusions: The recovery from desflurane was significantly shorter among three inhalational anesthetics with no touch technique. In addition, no airway-related complication occurred. Clinical relevance: The recovery from desflurane might be useful to predict emergence by end-tidal inhalational concentration.

元の言語英語
ジャーナルClinical Oral Investigations
DOI
出版物ステータス出版済み - 1 1 2019

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Retrospective Studies
Pediatrics
Touch
Anesthetics
Isoflurane
General Anesthesia
Eye Movements
desflurane
sevoflurane

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Dentistry(all)

これを引用

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title = "Comparison of recovery in pediatric patients: a retrospective study",
abstract = "Objective: The recovery after general anesthesia is influenced by the choice of inhalational agent. Stimulations might make patient’s agitate. However, the recovery using no touch technique might be safer. In this study, we compared the recovery time, awakening end-tidal concentration, and respiratory complications among inhalational anesthetics in pediatric patients using no touch technique, retrospectively. Material and methods: The subjects were pediatric patients aged 3 months to 11 years under general anesthesia using sevoflurane, isoflurane, or desflurane. Background, awakening end-tidal concentration, respiratory complications, the time of eye open, body movement, and extubation were recorded. Results: A total of 170 patients were included in the study. There were no respiratory complications during emergence. Awakening end-tidal concentration in desflurane was 0.98{\%}, sevoflurane (0.39{\%}), and isoflurane (0.25{\%}). In patients received desflurane, the time of body movement, eye open, and extubation were significantly shorter than patients who received other anesthetics (p < 0.05). Conclusions: The recovery from desflurane was significantly shorter among three inhalational anesthetics with no touch technique. In addition, no airway-related complication occurred. Clinical relevance: The recovery from desflurane might be useful to predict emergence by end-tidal inhalational concentration.",
author = "Masanori Tsukamoto and Takashi Hitosugi and Takeshi Yokoyama",
year = "2019",
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AU - Hitosugi, Takashi

AU - Yokoyama, Takeshi

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Y1 - 2019/1/1

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AB - Objective: The recovery after general anesthesia is influenced by the choice of inhalational agent. Stimulations might make patient’s agitate. However, the recovery using no touch technique might be safer. In this study, we compared the recovery time, awakening end-tidal concentration, and respiratory complications among inhalational anesthetics in pediatric patients using no touch technique, retrospectively. Material and methods: The subjects were pediatric patients aged 3 months to 11 years under general anesthesia using sevoflurane, isoflurane, or desflurane. Background, awakening end-tidal concentration, respiratory complications, the time of eye open, body movement, and extubation were recorded. Results: A total of 170 patients were included in the study. There were no respiratory complications during emergence. Awakening end-tidal concentration in desflurane was 0.98%, sevoflurane (0.39%), and isoflurane (0.25%). In patients received desflurane, the time of body movement, eye open, and extubation were significantly shorter than patients who received other anesthetics (p < 0.05). Conclusions: The recovery from desflurane was significantly shorter among three inhalational anesthetics with no touch technique. In addition, no airway-related complication occurred. Clinical relevance: The recovery from desflurane might be useful to predict emergence by end-tidal inhalational concentration.

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