Cultural evolution of hinoeuma superstition controlling human mate choice: The role of half-believer

Makoto Hara, Jounghun Lee, Yoh Iwasa

研究成果: ジャーナルへの寄稿記事

1 引用 (Scopus)

抄録

In this study, we used a cultural dynamic model to explain the persistence of the hinoeuma superstition in traditional Japan. Men with this superstition avoid marrying women born in a hinoeuma year (or hinoeuma-women). Parents avoided childbirth during the last hinoeuma year out of the concern that their daughter would have trouble finding a husband in the future, and this resulted in a large drop in the number of babies born in 1966. A previous theoretical analysis of the hinoeuma superstition considered two alternative cultural factors: believers and nonbelievers. In the present study, we considered a third cultural factor, the half-believer. A man that is a half-believer accepts a hinoeuma-woman as his wife, but parents that are half-believers avoid childbirth during hinoeuma years. With these three cultural factors, there are two possible outcomes for the population. In the first outcome, [1] non-believers become extinct, with the population consisting of believers and half-believers; some men refuse hinoeuma-women as their mate choice, and most parents attempt to avoid childbirth during hinoeuma years. In the second outcome, [2] believers become extinct, and the remaining population consists of non-believers and half-believers; no man refuses hinoeuma-women, and some parents avoid childbirth in hinoeuma years to prevent potential harm to their daughters. If birth control fails at a steady rate, believers will become extinct eventually. The superstition is more likely to be maintained if the mother has a stronger influence on the beliefs of her children than the father.

元の言語英語
ページ(範囲)40-49
ページ数10
ジャーナルJournal of Theoretical Biology
385
DOI
出版物ステータス出版済み - 11 21 2015

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Cultural Evolution
Superstitions
childbirth
mating behavior
Dynamic models
Parents
Parturition
Nuclear Family
Spouses
Japan
Persistence
Theoretical Analysis
Dynamic Model
Population
contraception
Likely
infants
fathers
Contraception
Fathers

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Statistics and Probability
  • Modelling and Simulation
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Immunology and Microbiology(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Applied Mathematics

これを引用

Cultural evolution of hinoeuma superstition controlling human mate choice : The role of half-believer. / Hara, Makoto; Lee, Jounghun; Iwasa, Yoh.

:: Journal of Theoretical Biology, 巻 385, 21.11.2015, p. 40-49.

研究成果: ジャーナルへの寄稿記事

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