Determination of Pesticides by Gas Chromatography Combined with Mass Spectrometry Using Femtosecond Lasers Emitting at 267, 400, and 800 nm as the Ionization Source

Xixiang Yang, Tomoko Imasaka, Totaro Imasaka

研究成果: ジャーナルへの寄稿記事

2 引用 (Scopus)

抄録

A standard sample mixture containing 51 pesticides was separated by gas chromatography (GC), and the constituents were identified by mass spectrometry (MS) using femtosecond lasers emitting at 267, 400, and 800 nm as the ionization source. A two-dimensional display of the GC/MS was successfully used for the determination of these compounds. A molecular ion was observed for 38 of the compounds at 267 nm and for 30 of the compounds at 800 nm, in contrast to 27 among 50 compounds when electron ionization was used. These results suggest that the ultraviolet laser is superior to the near-infrared laser for molecular weight determinations and for a more reliable analysis of these compounds. In order to study the conditions for optimal ionization, the experimental data were examined using the spectral properties (i.e., the excitation and ionization energies and absorption spectra for the neutral and ionized species) obtained by quantum chemical calculations. A few molecules remained unexplained by the currently reported rules, requiring additional rules for developing a full understanding of the femtosecond ionization process. The pesticides in the homogenized matrix obtained from kabosu (citrus sphaerocarpa) were measured using lasers emitting at 267 and 800 nm. The pesticides were clearly separated and measured on the two-dimensional display, especially for the data measured at 267 nm, suggesting that this technique would have potential for use in the practical trace analysis of the pesticides in the environment.

元の言語英語
ページ(範囲)4886-4893
ページ数8
ジャーナルAnalytical Chemistry
90
発行部数7
DOI
出版物ステータス出版済み - 4 3 2018

Fingerprint

Ion sources
Ultrashort pulses
Pesticides
Gas chromatography
Mass spectrometry
Ionization
Display devices
Trace analysis
Ultraviolet lasers
Ionization potential
Infrared lasers
Excitation energy
Intermetallics
Absorption spectra
Molecular weight
Ions
Molecules
Lasers

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Analytical Chemistry

これを引用

Determination of Pesticides by Gas Chromatography Combined with Mass Spectrometry Using Femtosecond Lasers Emitting at 267, 400, and 800 nm as the Ionization Source. / Yang, Xixiang; Imasaka, Tomoko; Imasaka, Totaro.

:: Analytical Chemistry, 巻 90, 番号 7, 03.04.2018, p. 4886-4893.

研究成果: ジャーナルへの寄稿記事

@article{3a1176f86cfa441ba443002dd5470aa0,
title = "Determination of Pesticides by Gas Chromatography Combined with Mass Spectrometry Using Femtosecond Lasers Emitting at 267, 400, and 800 nm as the Ionization Source",
abstract = "A standard sample mixture containing 51 pesticides was separated by gas chromatography (GC), and the constituents were identified by mass spectrometry (MS) using femtosecond lasers emitting at 267, 400, and 800 nm as the ionization source. A two-dimensional display of the GC/MS was successfully used for the determination of these compounds. A molecular ion was observed for 38 of the compounds at 267 nm and for 30 of the compounds at 800 nm, in contrast to 27 among 50 compounds when electron ionization was used. These results suggest that the ultraviolet laser is superior to the near-infrared laser for molecular weight determinations and for a more reliable analysis of these compounds. In order to study the conditions for optimal ionization, the experimental data were examined using the spectral properties (i.e., the excitation and ionization energies and absorption spectra for the neutral and ionized species) obtained by quantum chemical calculations. A few molecules remained unexplained by the currently reported rules, requiring additional rules for developing a full understanding of the femtosecond ionization process. The pesticides in the homogenized matrix obtained from kabosu (citrus sphaerocarpa) were measured using lasers emitting at 267 and 800 nm. The pesticides were clearly separated and measured on the two-dimensional display, especially for the data measured at 267 nm, suggesting that this technique would have potential for use in the practical trace analysis of the pesticides in the environment.",
author = "Xixiang Yang and Tomoko Imasaka and Totaro Imasaka",
year = "2018",
month = "4",
day = "3",
doi = "10.1021/acs.analchem.8b00537",
language = "English",
volume = "90",
pages = "4886--4893",
journal = "Analytical Chemistry",
issn = "0003-2700",
publisher = "American Chemical Society",
number = "7",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Determination of Pesticides by Gas Chromatography Combined with Mass Spectrometry Using Femtosecond Lasers Emitting at 267, 400, and 800 nm as the Ionization Source

AU - Yang, Xixiang

AU - Imasaka, Tomoko

AU - Imasaka, Totaro

PY - 2018/4/3

Y1 - 2018/4/3

N2 - A standard sample mixture containing 51 pesticides was separated by gas chromatography (GC), and the constituents were identified by mass spectrometry (MS) using femtosecond lasers emitting at 267, 400, and 800 nm as the ionization source. A two-dimensional display of the GC/MS was successfully used for the determination of these compounds. A molecular ion was observed for 38 of the compounds at 267 nm and for 30 of the compounds at 800 nm, in contrast to 27 among 50 compounds when electron ionization was used. These results suggest that the ultraviolet laser is superior to the near-infrared laser for molecular weight determinations and for a more reliable analysis of these compounds. In order to study the conditions for optimal ionization, the experimental data were examined using the spectral properties (i.e., the excitation and ionization energies and absorption spectra for the neutral and ionized species) obtained by quantum chemical calculations. A few molecules remained unexplained by the currently reported rules, requiring additional rules for developing a full understanding of the femtosecond ionization process. The pesticides in the homogenized matrix obtained from kabosu (citrus sphaerocarpa) were measured using lasers emitting at 267 and 800 nm. The pesticides were clearly separated and measured on the two-dimensional display, especially for the data measured at 267 nm, suggesting that this technique would have potential for use in the practical trace analysis of the pesticides in the environment.

AB - A standard sample mixture containing 51 pesticides was separated by gas chromatography (GC), and the constituents were identified by mass spectrometry (MS) using femtosecond lasers emitting at 267, 400, and 800 nm as the ionization source. A two-dimensional display of the GC/MS was successfully used for the determination of these compounds. A molecular ion was observed for 38 of the compounds at 267 nm and for 30 of the compounds at 800 nm, in contrast to 27 among 50 compounds when electron ionization was used. These results suggest that the ultraviolet laser is superior to the near-infrared laser for molecular weight determinations and for a more reliable analysis of these compounds. In order to study the conditions for optimal ionization, the experimental data were examined using the spectral properties (i.e., the excitation and ionization energies and absorption spectra for the neutral and ionized species) obtained by quantum chemical calculations. A few molecules remained unexplained by the currently reported rules, requiring additional rules for developing a full understanding of the femtosecond ionization process. The pesticides in the homogenized matrix obtained from kabosu (citrus sphaerocarpa) were measured using lasers emitting at 267 and 800 nm. The pesticides were clearly separated and measured on the two-dimensional display, especially for the data measured at 267 nm, suggesting that this technique would have potential for use in the practical trace analysis of the pesticides in the environment.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85044992794&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85044992794&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1021/acs.analchem.8b00537

DO - 10.1021/acs.analchem.8b00537

M3 - Article

C2 - 29509001

AN - SCOPUS:85044992794

VL - 90

SP - 4886

EP - 4893

JO - Analytical Chemistry

JF - Analytical Chemistry

SN - 0003-2700

IS - 7

ER -