Endogenous cannabinoid, 2-arachidonoylglycerol, attenuates naloxone-precipitated withdrawal signs in morphine-dependent mice

Taku Yamaguchi, Yumi Hagiwara, Hiroyuki Tanaka, Takayuki Sugiura, Keizo Waku, Yukihiro Shoyama, Shigenori Watanabe, Tsuneyuki Yamamoto

研究成果: ジャーナルへの寄稿記事

64 引用 (Scopus)

抄録

In the present study, we examined the effects of endogenous ligand 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) on naloxone-precipitated withdrawal in morphine-dependent mice, in comparison with that of two cannabinoid agonists, an ingredient of Cannabis sativa Δ8-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ8-THC) and the synthetic cannabinoid CB1 receptor agonist HU-210. 2-AG at a dose of 10 μg per mouse (i.c.v.) significantly inhibited both jumping and forepaw tremor as signs of withdrawal following naloxone challenge in morphine-dependent mice. Furthermore, both Δ8-THC and HU-210 significantly attenuated these symptoms of withdrawal in morphine-dependent mice. Therefore, it is suggested that inactivation of the endogenous cannabinoid system is related to the induction of withdrawal syndrome in morphine-dependent mice. Moreover, hyperlocomotor activity in morphine-dependent mice was markedly increased by Δ8-THC 10 mg/kg, which had no effect in naive mice. This finding suggested that in morphine dependence, upregulation of cannabinoid CB1 receptors occurred. Non-psychoactive CB1 receptor agonists or accelerators of endocannabinoid synthesis may be potential as therapeutic drugs for opiate withdrawal symptoms.

元の言語英語
ページ(範囲)121-126
ページ数6
ジャーナルBrain Research
909
発行部数1-2
DOI
出版物ステータス出版済み - 8 3 2001

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Cannabinoids
Naloxone
Morphine
Dronabinol
Cannabinoid Receptor Agonists
Cannabinoid Receptor CB1
Substance Withdrawal Syndrome
Opiate Alkaloids
Morphine Dependence
Endocannabinoids
Tremor
Cannabis
2-arachidonylglycerol
Up-Regulation
Ligands

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Molecular Biology
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Developmental Biology

これを引用

Yamaguchi, T., Hagiwara, Y., Tanaka, H., Sugiura, T., Waku, K., Shoyama, Y., ... Yamamoto, T. (2001). Endogenous cannabinoid, 2-arachidonoylglycerol, attenuates naloxone-precipitated withdrawal signs in morphine-dependent mice. Brain Research, 909(1-2), 121-126. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0006-8993(01)02655-5

Endogenous cannabinoid, 2-arachidonoylglycerol, attenuates naloxone-precipitated withdrawal signs in morphine-dependent mice. / Yamaguchi, Taku; Hagiwara, Yumi; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Sugiura, Takayuki; Waku, Keizo; Shoyama, Yukihiro; Watanabe, Shigenori; Yamamoto, Tsuneyuki.

:: Brain Research, 巻 909, 番号 1-2, 03.08.2001, p. 121-126.

研究成果: ジャーナルへの寄稿記事

Yamaguchi, T, Hagiwara, Y, Tanaka, H, Sugiura, T, Waku, K, Shoyama, Y, Watanabe, S & Yamamoto, T 2001, 'Endogenous cannabinoid, 2-arachidonoylglycerol, attenuates naloxone-precipitated withdrawal signs in morphine-dependent mice', Brain Research, 巻. 909, 番号 1-2, pp. 121-126. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0006-8993(01)02655-5
Yamaguchi, Taku ; Hagiwara, Yumi ; Tanaka, Hiroyuki ; Sugiura, Takayuki ; Waku, Keizo ; Shoyama, Yukihiro ; Watanabe, Shigenori ; Yamamoto, Tsuneyuki. / Endogenous cannabinoid, 2-arachidonoylglycerol, attenuates naloxone-precipitated withdrawal signs in morphine-dependent mice. :: Brain Research. 2001 ; 巻 909, 番号 1-2. pp. 121-126.
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