Engineering approach to irreversible electroporation

研究成果: 会議への寄与タイプ論文

抄録

Irreversible electroporation (IRE) is a new less-invasive therapy to treat abnormal tissues by applying a high voltage between the electrodes inserted in the tissue. Since the cell membrane exposed to the potential difference above a certain threshold is permanently disrupted, the IRE has a potential to necrotize cells without causing damage to the extracellular matrix (ECM), which is favorable for tissue regeneration during healing. However, determining an optimal condition of electrode configuration and applied pulses is critically important because an underdose of electrical pulses makes abnormal cells remain alive, while an overdose induces Joule heating of the tissue that causes thermal damage to the ECM. Studies from engineering point of view are therefore of great help to successful IRE. The present keynote lecture is a review of the authors' work associated with the IRE which includes a three-dimensional numerical simulation to estimate electric field and temperature distribution around electrodes, evaluation of cell destruction and thermal injury, detection of ultra-short temperature rise using a thermo-responsive ink, detection of denaturation of protein using Raman spectroscopy, and the IRE experiment with threedimensional cell culture model.

元の言語英語
出版物ステータス出版済み - 1 1 2014
イベント15th International Heat Transfer Conference, IHTC 2014 - Kyoto, 日本
継続期間: 8 10 20148 15 2014

その他

その他15th International Heat Transfer Conference, IHTC 2014
日本
Kyoto
期間8/10/148/15/14

Fingerprint

engineering
Tissue
Electrodes
electrodes
Tissue regeneration
Denaturation
Joule heating
cells
Cell membranes
damage
Cell culture
Ink
Raman spectroscopy
biopolymer denaturation
lectures
healing
inks
Temperature distribution
matrices
pulses

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Mechanical Engineering
  • Condensed Matter Physics

これを引用

Takamatsu, H., & Kurata, K. (2014). Engineering approach to irreversible electroporation. 論文発表場所 15th International Heat Transfer Conference, IHTC 2014, Kyoto, 日本.

Engineering approach to irreversible electroporation. / Takamatsu, Hiroshi; Kurata, Kosaku.

2014. 論文発表場所 15th International Heat Transfer Conference, IHTC 2014, Kyoto, 日本.

研究成果: 会議への寄与タイプ論文

Takamatsu, H & Kurata, K 2014, 'Engineering approach to irreversible electroporation' 論文発表場所 15th International Heat Transfer Conference, IHTC 2014, Kyoto, 日本, 8/10/14 - 8/15/14, .
Takamatsu H, Kurata K. Engineering approach to irreversible electroporation. 2014. 論文発表場所 15th International Heat Transfer Conference, IHTC 2014, Kyoto, 日本.
Takamatsu, Hiroshi ; Kurata, Kosaku. / Engineering approach to irreversible electroporation. 論文発表場所 15th International Heat Transfer Conference, IHTC 2014, Kyoto, 日本.
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