Evaluation of the effects of maturity acceleration of rice straw and nitrogen fertilizer on application of aerobically fermented liquid fertilizer in rice production

Yasumaru Hira, Keisuke Saruta, Hirohiko Shuto, Takeo Yamakawa, Toshihiro Mochizuki, Eiji Inoue, Takashi Okayasu, Muneshi Mitsuoka

研究成果: ジャーナルへの寄稿記事

抄録

There is growing concern to promote the use of aerobically fermented liquid fertilizer produced from human waste and sludge to reduce the cost, environmental load, and energy consumption in rice production. We tested the maturity accelerating effects on rice straw and effects as a nitrogen fertilizer by applying liquid fertilizer in 2009 and 2010. The maturity accelerating effects were not significant in terms of dry weight, total nitrogen content (T-N), and nitrogen uptake. When liquid fertilizer, which had an ammonium nitrogen (NH4-N) ratio of approximately 70%, was incorporated into the plow layer of the soil as a basal fertilizer, the nitrogen fertilizer effect and panicle number were equivalent to those for chemical fertilizers. However, when liquid fertilizer with a low NH4-N ratio was applied, the dry weight, T-N, and nitrogen uptake were lowered resulting in reduced panicle number. When applied as a top-dressing on the soil surface, nitrogen uptake decreased because of NH4-N loss through volatilization. This decrease in nitrogen uptake may have reduced spikelet number. Nitrogen uptake slowed under the low NH4-N ratio, and nitrogen nutrition conditions deteriorated during the ripening period. This may have lowered 1000-grain weight under the high average temperature conditions in 2010 (26.7°C during the 20-d period after heading). The yield tended to be low because of these reductions in yield components. Nitrogen fertilizer effects were affected by NH4-N ratio, whose fluctuation is considered problematic.

元の言語英語
ページ(範囲)325-336
ページ数12
ジャーナルJapanese Journal of Crop Science
82
発行部数4
DOI
出版物ステータス出版済み - 2013

Fingerprint

liquid fertilizers
Fertilizers
rice straw
nitrogen fertilizers
Nitrogen
rice
nitrogen
nitrogen content
fertilizers
top dressings
ammonium nitrogen
plows
volatilization
heading
sludge
Weights and Measures
yield components
Oryza
soil
ripening

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Food Science
  • Agronomy and Crop Science
  • Genetics

これを引用

@article{93cc8eac9eff42eb8c06efa792a7a5af,
title = "Evaluation of the effects of maturity acceleration of rice straw and nitrogen fertilizer on application of aerobically fermented liquid fertilizer in rice production",
abstract = "There is growing concern to promote the use of aerobically fermented liquid fertilizer produced from human waste and sludge to reduce the cost, environmental load, and energy consumption in rice production. We tested the maturity accelerating effects on rice straw and effects as a nitrogen fertilizer by applying liquid fertilizer in 2009 and 2010. The maturity accelerating effects were not significant in terms of dry weight, total nitrogen content (T-N), and nitrogen uptake. When liquid fertilizer, which had an ammonium nitrogen (NH4-N) ratio of approximately 70{\%}, was incorporated into the plow layer of the soil as a basal fertilizer, the nitrogen fertilizer effect and panicle number were equivalent to those for chemical fertilizers. However, when liquid fertilizer with a low NH4-N ratio was applied, the dry weight, T-N, and nitrogen uptake were lowered resulting in reduced panicle number. When applied as a top-dressing on the soil surface, nitrogen uptake decreased because of NH4-N loss through volatilization. This decrease in nitrogen uptake may have reduced spikelet number. Nitrogen uptake slowed under the low NH4-N ratio, and nitrogen nutrition conditions deteriorated during the ripening period. This may have lowered 1000-grain weight under the high average temperature conditions in 2010 (26.7°C during the 20-d period after heading). The yield tended to be low because of these reductions in yield components. Nitrogen fertilizer effects were affected by NH4-N ratio, whose fluctuation is considered problematic.",
author = "Yasumaru Hira and Keisuke Saruta and Hirohiko Shuto and Takeo Yamakawa and Toshihiro Mochizuki and Eiji Inoue and Takashi Okayasu and Muneshi Mitsuoka",
year = "2013",
doi = "10.1626/jcs.82.325",
language = "English",
volume = "82",
pages = "325--336",
journal = "Japanese Journal of Crop Science",
issn = "1349-0990",
publisher = "日本作物学会",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Evaluation of the effects of maturity acceleration of rice straw and nitrogen fertilizer on application of aerobically fermented liquid fertilizer in rice production

AU - Hira, Yasumaru

AU - Saruta, Keisuke

AU - Shuto, Hirohiko

AU - Yamakawa, Takeo

AU - Mochizuki, Toshihiro

AU - Inoue, Eiji

AU - Okayasu, Takashi

AU - Mitsuoka, Muneshi

PY - 2013

Y1 - 2013

N2 - There is growing concern to promote the use of aerobically fermented liquid fertilizer produced from human waste and sludge to reduce the cost, environmental load, and energy consumption in rice production. We tested the maturity accelerating effects on rice straw and effects as a nitrogen fertilizer by applying liquid fertilizer in 2009 and 2010. The maturity accelerating effects were not significant in terms of dry weight, total nitrogen content (T-N), and nitrogen uptake. When liquid fertilizer, which had an ammonium nitrogen (NH4-N) ratio of approximately 70%, was incorporated into the plow layer of the soil as a basal fertilizer, the nitrogen fertilizer effect and panicle number were equivalent to those for chemical fertilizers. However, when liquid fertilizer with a low NH4-N ratio was applied, the dry weight, T-N, and nitrogen uptake were lowered resulting in reduced panicle number. When applied as a top-dressing on the soil surface, nitrogen uptake decreased because of NH4-N loss through volatilization. This decrease in nitrogen uptake may have reduced spikelet number. Nitrogen uptake slowed under the low NH4-N ratio, and nitrogen nutrition conditions deteriorated during the ripening period. This may have lowered 1000-grain weight under the high average temperature conditions in 2010 (26.7°C during the 20-d period after heading). The yield tended to be low because of these reductions in yield components. Nitrogen fertilizer effects were affected by NH4-N ratio, whose fluctuation is considered problematic.

AB - There is growing concern to promote the use of aerobically fermented liquid fertilizer produced from human waste and sludge to reduce the cost, environmental load, and energy consumption in rice production. We tested the maturity accelerating effects on rice straw and effects as a nitrogen fertilizer by applying liquid fertilizer in 2009 and 2010. The maturity accelerating effects were not significant in terms of dry weight, total nitrogen content (T-N), and nitrogen uptake. When liquid fertilizer, which had an ammonium nitrogen (NH4-N) ratio of approximately 70%, was incorporated into the plow layer of the soil as a basal fertilizer, the nitrogen fertilizer effect and panicle number were equivalent to those for chemical fertilizers. However, when liquid fertilizer with a low NH4-N ratio was applied, the dry weight, T-N, and nitrogen uptake were lowered resulting in reduced panicle number. When applied as a top-dressing on the soil surface, nitrogen uptake decreased because of NH4-N loss through volatilization. This decrease in nitrogen uptake may have reduced spikelet number. Nitrogen uptake slowed under the low NH4-N ratio, and nitrogen nutrition conditions deteriorated during the ripening period. This may have lowered 1000-grain weight under the high average temperature conditions in 2010 (26.7°C during the 20-d period after heading). The yield tended to be low because of these reductions in yield components. Nitrogen fertilizer effects were affected by NH4-N ratio, whose fluctuation is considered problematic.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84940318048&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84940318048&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1626/jcs.82.325

DO - 10.1626/jcs.82.325

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:84940318048

VL - 82

SP - 325

EP - 336

JO - Japanese Journal of Crop Science

JF - Japanese Journal of Crop Science

SN - 1349-0990

IS - 4

ER -