Ibsen's Nora and the Confucian Critique of the “Unencumbered Self”

研究成果: ジャーナルへの寄稿記事

抄録

Criticisms of the liberal-individualist idea of the “unencumbered self” are not just a staple of communitarian thought. Some modern Confucian thinkers are now seeking to develop an ethically particular understanding of social roles in the family that is sensitive to gender-justice issues, and that provides an alternative to liberal-individualist conceptions of the “unencumbered self” in relation to family roles. The character of Nora in Henrik Ibsen's A Doll's House seemingly exemplifies such conceptions of the unencumbered self in her rejection of her housewife role for a more authentic selfhood. Drawing upon the capabilities approach to justice, and positive early Japanese bluestockings’ responses to Ibsen's play, I argue that Nora's character is better understood as exemplifying an ethically compelling disencumbered self in potentially cross-cultural circumstances: a self criticizing and rejecting social roles that are found to be unjust according to universal, as opposed to particularist, “Confucian” ethical standards.

元の言語英語
ページ(範囲)890-906
ページ数17
ジャーナルHypatia
31
発行部数4
DOI
出版物ステータス出版済み - 9 1 2016

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Social Role
justice
housewife
criticism
gender
Henrik Ibsen
Confucian
Conception

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Gender Studies
  • Philosophy

これを引用

Ibsen's Nora and the Confucian Critique of the “Unencumbered Self”. / Odwyer, Shaun Richard.

:: Hypatia, 巻 31, 番号 4, 01.09.2016, p. 890-906.

研究成果: ジャーナルへの寄稿記事

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