Identification of a novel function of the silkworm integument in nitrogen metabolism: Uric acid is synthesized within the epidermal cells in B. mori

Tsuguru Fujii, Yutaka Banno

研究成果: ジャーナルへの寄稿記事

1 引用 (Scopus)

抄録

During nitrogen metabolism, animals convert toxic ammonia to less toxic forms. Uric acid (UA) is an end product of this process in terrestrial insects. In lepidopteran larvae, a large amount of UA is stored in the integument via a phenomenon known as storage excretion. Physiologically, integumental UA plays crucial roles as a barrier against sunlight and as a white pigment for larval pigmentation patterns. Conventionally, UA is thought to be synthesized in the fat body, the insect equivalent of the liver of vertebrates, and to be transported to the epidermis via the hemolymph. Here, we reconsidered the conventional theory by a mosaic analysis targeting genes governing UA synthesis, using CRISPR/Cas9 mutagenesis and a traditional genetic method in Bombyx mori. Notably, we observed mosaic larvae in which the integument comprised both UA-containing white and UA-lacking translucent areas, indicating that UA synthesis in the epidermis is indispensable to the accumulation of a large amount of highly insoluble UA in the epidermis. Our results thus provide a genetic basis for storage excretion wherein lepidopteran insects use nitrogenous waste to adapt to their environment.

元の言語英語
ページ(範囲)43-50
ページ数8
ジャーナルInsect Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
105
DOI
出版物ステータス出版済み - 2 1 2019

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Morus
Bombyx
nitrogen metabolism
uric acid
silkworms
Uric Acid
integument
Metabolism
B-lymphocytes
Nitrogen
epidermis (animal)
Epidermis
Insects
Poisons
insects
Larva
Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats
excretion
Lepidoptera
Mutagenesis

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biochemistry
  • Molecular Biology
  • Insect Science

これを引用

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abstract = "During nitrogen metabolism, animals convert toxic ammonia to less toxic forms. Uric acid (UA) is an end product of this process in terrestrial insects. In lepidopteran larvae, a large amount of UA is stored in the integument via a phenomenon known as storage excretion. Physiologically, integumental UA plays crucial roles as a barrier against sunlight and as a white pigment for larval pigmentation patterns. Conventionally, UA is thought to be synthesized in the fat body, the insect equivalent of the liver of vertebrates, and to be transported to the epidermis via the hemolymph. Here, we reconsidered the conventional theory by a mosaic analysis targeting genes governing UA synthesis, using CRISPR/Cas9 mutagenesis and a traditional genetic method in Bombyx mori. Notably, we observed mosaic larvae in which the integument comprised both UA-containing white and UA-lacking translucent areas, indicating that UA synthesis in the epidermis is indispensable to the accumulation of a large amount of highly insoluble UA in the epidermis. Our results thus provide a genetic basis for storage excretion wherein lepidopteran insects use nitrogenous waste to adapt to their environment.",
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