Illusory self-motion (Vection) may be inhibited by hypobaric hypoxia

Takayuki Nishimura, Takeharu Senoo, Midori Motoi, Shigeki Watanuki

研究成果: ジャーナルへの寄稿記事

抄録

Introduction: Previous reports have shown that higher altitudes can alter human perception. We add further evidence to this claim, describing a new finding in which higher altitudes inhibit the perception of illusory self-motion, i.e., vection. Method: We compared vection strength under both normal and high altitude (hypobaric hypoxia) conditions. In the high altitude condition, atmospheric pressure in the climatic chamber was decreased to 13,123 ft (4000 m; 492 ft/150 m · min -1) for 28 min and then maintained at the 13,123-ft (4000-m) level for 30 min by a preprogrammed operation. Vection was induced by an optic flow stimulus. Results: Significant differences were observed between the normal and high altitude conditions for all three of the vection strength measurements (latency, duration, and magnitude). Vection was decreased by 14.6%, and SPO2 was decreased by 16.7% in the hypoxia condition. Conclusion: Vection was inhibited in the high altitude condition. Applications of this finding include informing aircraft pilots of this effect of self-motion perception inhibition at higher altitudes to promote safer flying.

元の言語英語
ページ(範囲)504-508
ページ数5
ジャーナルAviation Space and Environmental Medicine
85
発行部数5
DOI
出版物ステータス出版済み - 2014

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Optic Flow
Altitude Sickness
Motion Perception
Atmospheric Pressure
Aircraft
Hypoxia
Pilots
Inhibition (Psychology)

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

これを引用

Illusory self-motion (Vection) may be inhibited by hypobaric hypoxia. / Nishimura, Takayuki; Senoo, Takeharu; Motoi, Midori; Watanuki, Shigeki.

:: Aviation Space and Environmental Medicine, 巻 85, 番号 5, 2014, p. 504-508.

研究成果: ジャーナルへの寄稿記事

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abstract = "Introduction: Previous reports have shown that higher altitudes can alter human perception. We add further evidence to this claim, describing a new finding in which higher altitudes inhibit the perception of illusory self-motion, i.e., vection. Method: We compared vection strength under both normal and high altitude (hypobaric hypoxia) conditions. In the high altitude condition, atmospheric pressure in the climatic chamber was decreased to 13,123 ft (4000 m; 492 ft/150 m · min -1) for 28 min and then maintained at the 13,123-ft (4000-m) level for 30 min by a preprogrammed operation. Vection was induced by an optic flow stimulus. Results: Significant differences were observed between the normal and high altitude conditions for all three of the vection strength measurements (latency, duration, and magnitude). Vection was decreased by 14.6{\%}, and SPO2 was decreased by 16.7{\%} in the hypoxia condition. Conclusion: Vection was inhibited in the high altitude condition. Applications of this finding include informing aircraft pilots of this effect of self-motion perception inhibition at higher altitudes to promote safer flying.",
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