Influence of the Arrangement of Surgical Light Axes on the Air Environment in Operating Rooms

Tetsuya Kai, Nobuyasu Ayagaki, Hidekazu Setoguchi

研究成果: ジャーナルへの寄稿記事

抄録

Purpose. Surgical lights in the operating rooms are typically installed in a single axis in the center of the room or in two axes on both sides of the operating table. In the single-axis installation, the air-conditioning outlet cannot be placed in the center of the ceiling, which may affect the air current. Therefore, we measured the air current and cleanliness in two equivalent operating rooms using a vertical laminar airflow system equipped with either single-axis or double-axis surgical lights. Methods. Air current was measured using a three-dimensional ultrasonic anemometer. Cleanliness was evaluated by measuring the amount of dust before and after air-conditioner activation. To visualize the air current, smoke was illuminated on a sheet of laser light while the air-conditioning was stopped, and changes after air-conditioning activation were observed. Results. In the single-axis room, an oblique fast air current flowing from the surrounding air outlet toward the center was observed, and the flow velocity fluctuated greatly. In the double-axis room, uniform downward laminar airflow was observed. The amount of dust at the center decreased significantly faster in the double-axis room; thus, the cleanliness at the center was higher in the double-axis room. Persistent stagnation of smoke was observed below the single-axis lighting, whereas smoke below the double-axis lighting was immediately dispersed and the air cleared even when surgical lights were in the position for surgery. Conclusion. Uniform vertical laminar airflow was formed and high cleanliness was achieved in the center of the room when the surgical lights were arranged in two axes.

元の言語英語
記事番号4861273
ジャーナルJournal of Healthcare Engineering
2019
DOI
出版物ステータス出版済み - 1 1 2019

Fingerprint

Operating rooms
Operating Rooms
Air
Light
Air Conditioning
Smoke
Air conditioning
Lighting
Dust
Chemical activation
Operating Tables
Anemometers
Ceilings
Ultrasonics
Flow velocity
Surgery
Lasers

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biotechnology
  • Surgery
  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Health Informatics

これを引用

Influence of the Arrangement of Surgical Light Axes on the Air Environment in Operating Rooms. / Kai, Tetsuya; Ayagaki, Nobuyasu; Setoguchi, Hidekazu.

:: Journal of Healthcare Engineering, 巻 2019, 4861273, 01.01.2019.

研究成果: ジャーナルへの寄稿記事

@article{d9a6cbc038124fd3a9316dd04c560f0a,
title = "Influence of the Arrangement of Surgical Light Axes on the Air Environment in Operating Rooms",
abstract = "Purpose. Surgical lights in the operating rooms are typically installed in a single axis in the center of the room or in two axes on both sides of the operating table. In the single-axis installation, the air-conditioning outlet cannot be placed in the center of the ceiling, which may affect the air current. Therefore, we measured the air current and cleanliness in two equivalent operating rooms using a vertical laminar airflow system equipped with either single-axis or double-axis surgical lights. Methods. Air current was measured using a three-dimensional ultrasonic anemometer. Cleanliness was evaluated by measuring the amount of dust before and after air-conditioner activation. To visualize the air current, smoke was illuminated on a sheet of laser light while the air-conditioning was stopped, and changes after air-conditioning activation were observed. Results. In the single-axis room, an oblique fast air current flowing from the surrounding air outlet toward the center was observed, and the flow velocity fluctuated greatly. In the double-axis room, uniform downward laminar airflow was observed. The amount of dust at the center decreased significantly faster in the double-axis room; thus, the cleanliness at the center was higher in the double-axis room. Persistent stagnation of smoke was observed below the single-axis lighting, whereas smoke below the double-axis lighting was immediately dispersed and the air cleared even when surgical lights were in the position for surgery. Conclusion. Uniform vertical laminar airflow was formed and high cleanliness was achieved in the center of the room when the surgical lights were arranged in two axes.",
author = "Tetsuya Kai and Nobuyasu Ayagaki and Hidekazu Setoguchi",
year = "2019",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1155/2019/4861273",
language = "English",
volume = "2019",
journal = "Journal of Healthcare Engineering",
issn = "2040-2295",
publisher = "Multi Science Publishing",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Influence of the Arrangement of Surgical Light Axes on the Air Environment in Operating Rooms

AU - Kai, Tetsuya

AU - Ayagaki, Nobuyasu

AU - Setoguchi, Hidekazu

PY - 2019/1/1

Y1 - 2019/1/1

N2 - Purpose. Surgical lights in the operating rooms are typically installed in a single axis in the center of the room or in two axes on both sides of the operating table. In the single-axis installation, the air-conditioning outlet cannot be placed in the center of the ceiling, which may affect the air current. Therefore, we measured the air current and cleanliness in two equivalent operating rooms using a vertical laminar airflow system equipped with either single-axis or double-axis surgical lights. Methods. Air current was measured using a three-dimensional ultrasonic anemometer. Cleanliness was evaluated by measuring the amount of dust before and after air-conditioner activation. To visualize the air current, smoke was illuminated on a sheet of laser light while the air-conditioning was stopped, and changes after air-conditioning activation were observed. Results. In the single-axis room, an oblique fast air current flowing from the surrounding air outlet toward the center was observed, and the flow velocity fluctuated greatly. In the double-axis room, uniform downward laminar airflow was observed. The amount of dust at the center decreased significantly faster in the double-axis room; thus, the cleanliness at the center was higher in the double-axis room. Persistent stagnation of smoke was observed below the single-axis lighting, whereas smoke below the double-axis lighting was immediately dispersed and the air cleared even when surgical lights were in the position for surgery. Conclusion. Uniform vertical laminar airflow was formed and high cleanliness was achieved in the center of the room when the surgical lights were arranged in two axes.

AB - Purpose. Surgical lights in the operating rooms are typically installed in a single axis in the center of the room or in two axes on both sides of the operating table. In the single-axis installation, the air-conditioning outlet cannot be placed in the center of the ceiling, which may affect the air current. Therefore, we measured the air current and cleanliness in two equivalent operating rooms using a vertical laminar airflow system equipped with either single-axis or double-axis surgical lights. Methods. Air current was measured using a three-dimensional ultrasonic anemometer. Cleanliness was evaluated by measuring the amount of dust before and after air-conditioner activation. To visualize the air current, smoke was illuminated on a sheet of laser light while the air-conditioning was stopped, and changes after air-conditioning activation were observed. Results. In the single-axis room, an oblique fast air current flowing from the surrounding air outlet toward the center was observed, and the flow velocity fluctuated greatly. In the double-axis room, uniform downward laminar airflow was observed. The amount of dust at the center decreased significantly faster in the double-axis room; thus, the cleanliness at the center was higher in the double-axis room. Persistent stagnation of smoke was observed below the single-axis lighting, whereas smoke below the double-axis lighting was immediately dispersed and the air cleared even when surgical lights were in the position for surgery. Conclusion. Uniform vertical laminar airflow was formed and high cleanliness was achieved in the center of the room when the surgical lights were arranged in two axes.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85064260590&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85064260590&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1155/2019/4861273

DO - 10.1155/2019/4861273

M3 - Article

C2 - 31049187

AN - SCOPUS:85064260590

VL - 2019

JO - Journal of Healthcare Engineering

JF - Journal of Healthcare Engineering

SN - 2040-2295

M1 - 4861273

ER -