Inverse association between coffee drinking and serum uric acid concentrations in middle-aged Japanese males

Chikako Kiyohara, S. Kono, S. Honjo, I. Todoroki, Y. Sakurai, M. Nishiwaki, H. Hamada, H. Nishikawa, H. Koga, S. Ogawa, K. Nakagawa

研究成果: ジャーナルへの寄稿記事

65 引用 (Scopus)

抄録

Consumption of caffeine-rich beverages, which have diuretic properties, may decrease serum uric acid concentrations. We examined cross-sectionally the relationship of coffee and green tea consumption to serum uric acid concentrations in 2240 male self-defence officials who received a pre-retirement health examination at four hospitals of the Self-Defence Forces between 1993 and 1994. The mean levels of coffee and green tea consumption were 2.3 and 3.1 cups/d respectively. There was a clear inverse relationship between coffee consumption and serum uric acid concentration. When adjusted for hospital only, those consuming less than one cup of coffee daily had a mean serum uric acid concentration of 60 mg/l, while that of those drinking five or more cups of coffee daily was 56 mg/l (P < 0.0001). No such relationship was observed for green tea, another major dietary source of caffeine in Japan. The relationship between coffee consumption and serum uric acid concentration was independent of age, rank in the Self-Defence Forces, BMI, systolic blood pressure, serum treatinine, serum total cholesterol and serum HDL-cholesterol concentrations, smoking status, alcohol use, beer consumption and intake of dairy products. These findings suggest that coffee drinking may be associated with lower concentrations of serum uric acid, and further studies are needed to confirm the association.

元の言語英語
ページ(範囲)125-130
ページ数6
ジャーナルBritish Journal of Nutrition
82
発行部数2
出版物ステータス出版済み - 9 2 1999

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Coffee
Uric Acid
Drinking
Serum
Tea
Caffeine
Blood Pressure
Dairy Products
Retirement
Beverages
Diuretics
HDL Cholesterol
Japan
Smoking
Cholesterol
Alcohols
Health

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

これを引用

Kiyohara, C., Kono, S., Honjo, S., Todoroki, I., Sakurai, Y., Nishiwaki, M., ... Nakagawa, K. (1999). Inverse association between coffee drinking and serum uric acid concentrations in middle-aged Japanese males. British Journal of Nutrition, 82(2), 125-130.

Inverse association between coffee drinking and serum uric acid concentrations in middle-aged Japanese males. / Kiyohara, Chikako; Kono, S.; Honjo, S.; Todoroki, I.; Sakurai, Y.; Nishiwaki, M.; Hamada, H.; Nishikawa, H.; Koga, H.; Ogawa, S.; Nakagawa, K.

:: British Journal of Nutrition, 巻 82, 番号 2, 02.09.1999, p. 125-130.

研究成果: ジャーナルへの寄稿記事

Kiyohara, C, Kono, S, Honjo, S, Todoroki, I, Sakurai, Y, Nishiwaki, M, Hamada, H, Nishikawa, H, Koga, H, Ogawa, S & Nakagawa, K 1999, 'Inverse association between coffee drinking and serum uric acid concentrations in middle-aged Japanese males', British Journal of Nutrition, 巻. 82, 番号 2, pp. 125-130.
Kiyohara, Chikako ; Kono, S. ; Honjo, S. ; Todoroki, I. ; Sakurai, Y. ; Nishiwaki, M. ; Hamada, H. ; Nishikawa, H. ; Koga, H. ; Ogawa, S. ; Nakagawa, K. / Inverse association between coffee drinking and serum uric acid concentrations in middle-aged Japanese males. :: British Journal of Nutrition. 1999 ; 巻 82, 番号 2. pp. 125-130.
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