Lead levels in ancient and contemporary Japanese bones

Akira Hisanaga, Yukuo Eguchi, Miyuki Hirata, Noburu Ishinishi

研究成果: ジャーナルへの寄稿記事

17 引用 (Scopus)

抄録

During the past few centuries, lead production, consumption and emissions, to our total environment have increased remarkably. We have determined the concentrations of lead in 41 well-preserved ancient and 11 contemporary rib bones of a mature age (40-60 y), with a view to historically evaluating lead exposure in humans. The oldest Japanese bones (1000-300 b.c.) were found to contain a mean of 0.58 μg Pb/g dry wt and a mean molar ratio of lead to calcium of 0.6×10-6, compared with 4.7-5.2×10-6 in the bones of the Edo era (1600-1867 a.d.) and contemporary residents in Japan. The mean molar ratios of female bones were always higher than those of male bones for each era. From this fact we may assume that facial cosmetics were one of the main routes of lead exposure among the ancient Japanese, especially those who lived during the Edo era.

元の言語英語
ページ(範囲)77-85
ページ数9
ジャーナルBiological Trace Element Research
16
発行部数1
DOI
出版物ステータス出版済み - 6 1 1988

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Bone
Bone and Bones
Cosmetics
Ribs
Japan
Lead
Calcium

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Biochemistry
  • Clinical Biochemistry
  • Inorganic Chemistry
  • Biochemistry, medical

これを引用

Lead levels in ancient and contemporary Japanese bones. / Hisanaga, Akira; Eguchi, Yukuo; Hirata, Miyuki; Ishinishi, Noburu.

:: Biological Trace Element Research, 巻 16, 番号 1, 01.06.1988, p. 77-85.

研究成果: ジャーナルへの寄稿記事

Hisanaga, Akira ; Eguchi, Yukuo ; Hirata, Miyuki ; Ishinishi, Noburu. / Lead levels in ancient and contemporary Japanese bones. :: Biological Trace Element Research. 1988 ; 巻 16, 番号 1. pp. 77-85.
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