Life history strategy and adult and larval behavior of Macrodiplosis selenis (Diptera

Cecidomyiidae), a species that induces leaf-margin fold galls on deciduous Quercus (Fagaceae)

Wanggyu Kim, Kiyoko Matsunaga, Naohisa Gyoutoku, Kazunori Matsuo, Tsuneo Minami, Junichi Yukawa

研究成果: ジャーナルへの寄稿記事

2 引用 (Scopus)

抄録

Life historical, behavioral and ecological traits of Macrodiplosis selenis, which induces leaf-margin fold galls on Quercus serrata, Q.mongolica and Q.dentata (Fagaceae) in Japan and South Korea, were studied. Daily activity and larval development indicate that M.selenis is a diurnal and univoltine gall midge. In April, females lay their eggs both on upper and under surfaces of fresh leaves. The duration of the egg stage varies from 5 to 9 days, depending on daily temperatures. Hatched larvae crawl to the upper surface of the leaf margin, where they start to induce galls. Larvae become full-grown in October, drop to the ground in November and overwinter in cocoons on the ground, while larvae of congeners mature in May and drop to the ground in June. A relatively long period of the second larval stadium from July to October on the host trees seems to be effective for M.selenis in avoiding summer mortalities caused by predation and aridity on the ground and by ectoparasitoids that attack mature larvae or pupae on the host leaves. The spatial distribution pattern of M.selenis leaf galls is contagious and the mean gall density per leaf is significantly correlated with the mean crowding. This study adds new insights of life history strategy and adult and larval behavioral pattern to the ecological knowledge of gall midges, and these kinds of information are essential for further studies of M.selenis population dynamics and interactions with other Quercus-associated herbivores.

元の言語英語
ページ(範囲)470-478
ページ数9
ジャーナルEntomological Science
18
発行部数4
DOI
出版物ステータス出版済み - 10 1 2015

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Fagaceae
Cecidomyiidae
gall
galls
Quercus
life history
fold
larvae
larva
leaves
leaf galls
Quercus serrata
egg
dry environmental conditions
South Korea
cocoons
cocoon
larval development
pupae
pupa

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Insect Science

これを引用

Life history strategy and adult and larval behavior of Macrodiplosis selenis (Diptera : Cecidomyiidae), a species that induces leaf-margin fold galls on deciduous Quercus (Fagaceae). / Kim, Wanggyu; Matsunaga, Kiyoko; Gyoutoku, Naohisa; Matsuo, Kazunori; Minami, Tsuneo; Yukawa, Junichi.

:: Entomological Science, 巻 18, 番号 4, 01.10.2015, p. 470-478.

研究成果: ジャーナルへの寄稿記事

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abstract = "Life historical, behavioral and ecological traits of Macrodiplosis selenis, which induces leaf-margin fold galls on Quercus serrata, Q.mongolica and Q.dentata (Fagaceae) in Japan and South Korea, were studied. Daily activity and larval development indicate that M.selenis is a diurnal and univoltine gall midge. In April, females lay their eggs both on upper and under surfaces of fresh leaves. The duration of the egg stage varies from 5 to 9 days, depending on daily temperatures. Hatched larvae crawl to the upper surface of the leaf margin, where they start to induce galls. Larvae become full-grown in October, drop to the ground in November and overwinter in cocoons on the ground, while larvae of congeners mature in May and drop to the ground in June. A relatively long period of the second larval stadium from July to October on the host trees seems to be effective for M.selenis in avoiding summer mortalities caused by predation and aridity on the ground and by ectoparasitoids that attack mature larvae or pupae on the host leaves. The spatial distribution pattern of M.selenis leaf galls is contagious and the mean gall density per leaf is significantly correlated with the mean crowding. This study adds new insights of life history strategy and adult and larval behavioral pattern to the ecological knowledge of gall midges, and these kinds of information are essential for further studies of M.selenis population dynamics and interactions with other Quercus-associated herbivores.",
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