Mineral Trioxide Aggregate Induces Bone Morphogenetic Protein-2 Expression and Calcification in Human Periodontal Ligament Cells

Hidefumi Maeda, Tsuguhisa Nakano, Atsushi Tomokiyo, Shinsuke Fujii, Naohisa Wada, Satoshi Monnouchi, Kiyomi Hori, Akifumi Akamine

研究成果: ジャーナルへの寄稿記事

64 引用 (Scopus)

抄録

Introduction: Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) is a therapeutic, endodontic repair material that is reported to exhibit calcified tissue-conductive activity although the mechanisms remain unclear. We hypothesize that the dissolution of calcium from MTA into the surrounding environment may play an important role in the osteoblastic/cementoblastic differentiation of human periodontal ligament cells (HPLCs). Methods: Two populations of HPLCs were obtained from two patients, respectively, and were cultured in the presence or absence of MTA discs and/or CaCl2 in order to investigate calcium release, calcification activity, calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) gene expression and bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2), and BMP-2 receptor protein and gene expression. Results: MTA released a substantial accumulation of calcium (4 mmol/L) within 14 days into culture media. After 4 weeks, the two populations of HPLCs independently exhibited calcification as well as BMP-2 distribution in the vicinity of MTA. HPLCs inherently expressed genes encoding for the CaSR and BMP-2 receptors. Exogenous CaCl2 media supplementation induced CaSR gene expression in HPLCs and calcification and BMP-2 synthesis throughout the entire HPLC cultures, whereas MgCl2 had no effect. Both MTA and CaCl2 stimulated BMP-2 gene expression above that of baseline levels. Conclusion: Here we show the first report showing that HPLCs cocultured directly with MTA up-regulated BMP2 expression and calcification. These results may be through CaSR interactions that were potentially activated by the release of calcium from MTA into the culture environment.

元の言語英語
ページ(範囲)647-652
ページ数6
ジャーナルJournal of Endodontics
36
発行部数4
DOI
出版物ステータス出版済み - 4 1 2010

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Bone Morphogenetic Protein 2
Periodontal Ligament
Calcium-Sensing Receptors
Bone Morphogenetic Protein Receptors
Calcium
Gene Expression
Magnesium Chloride
mineral trioxide aggregate
Endodontics
Population
Culture Media
Cell Culture Techniques

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Dentistry(all)

これを引用

Mineral Trioxide Aggregate Induces Bone Morphogenetic Protein-2 Expression and Calcification in Human Periodontal Ligament Cells. / Maeda, Hidefumi; Nakano, Tsuguhisa; Tomokiyo, Atsushi; Fujii, Shinsuke; Wada, Naohisa; Monnouchi, Satoshi; Hori, Kiyomi; Akamine, Akifumi.

:: Journal of Endodontics, 巻 36, 番号 4, 01.04.2010, p. 647-652.

研究成果: ジャーナルへの寄稿記事

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abstract = "Introduction: Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) is a therapeutic, endodontic repair material that is reported to exhibit calcified tissue-conductive activity although the mechanisms remain unclear. We hypothesize that the dissolution of calcium from MTA into the surrounding environment may play an important role in the osteoblastic/cementoblastic differentiation of human periodontal ligament cells (HPLCs). Methods: Two populations of HPLCs were obtained from two patients, respectively, and were cultured in the presence or absence of MTA discs and/or CaCl2 in order to investigate calcium release, calcification activity, calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) gene expression and bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2), and BMP-2 receptor protein and gene expression. Results: MTA released a substantial accumulation of calcium (4 mmol/L) within 14 days into culture media. After 4 weeks, the two populations of HPLCs independently exhibited calcification as well as BMP-2 distribution in the vicinity of MTA. HPLCs inherently expressed genes encoding for the CaSR and BMP-2 receptors. Exogenous CaCl2 media supplementation induced CaSR gene expression in HPLCs and calcification and BMP-2 synthesis throughout the entire HPLC cultures, whereas MgCl2 had no effect. Both MTA and CaCl2 stimulated BMP-2 gene expression above that of baseline levels. Conclusion: Here we show the first report showing that HPLCs cocultured directly with MTA up-regulated BMP2 expression and calcification. These results may be through CaSR interactions that were potentially activated by the release of calcium from MTA into the culture environment.",
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AU - Maeda, Hidefumi

AU - Nakano, Tsuguhisa

AU - Tomokiyo, Atsushi

AU - Fujii, Shinsuke

AU - Wada, Naohisa

AU - Monnouchi, Satoshi

AU - Hori, Kiyomi

AU - Akamine, Akifumi

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N2 - Introduction: Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) is a therapeutic, endodontic repair material that is reported to exhibit calcified tissue-conductive activity although the mechanisms remain unclear. We hypothesize that the dissolution of calcium from MTA into the surrounding environment may play an important role in the osteoblastic/cementoblastic differentiation of human periodontal ligament cells (HPLCs). Methods: Two populations of HPLCs were obtained from two patients, respectively, and were cultured in the presence or absence of MTA discs and/or CaCl2 in order to investigate calcium release, calcification activity, calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) gene expression and bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2), and BMP-2 receptor protein and gene expression. Results: MTA released a substantial accumulation of calcium (4 mmol/L) within 14 days into culture media. After 4 weeks, the two populations of HPLCs independently exhibited calcification as well as BMP-2 distribution in the vicinity of MTA. HPLCs inherently expressed genes encoding for the CaSR and BMP-2 receptors. Exogenous CaCl2 media supplementation induced CaSR gene expression in HPLCs and calcification and BMP-2 synthesis throughout the entire HPLC cultures, whereas MgCl2 had no effect. Both MTA and CaCl2 stimulated BMP-2 gene expression above that of baseline levels. Conclusion: Here we show the first report showing that HPLCs cocultured directly with MTA up-regulated BMP2 expression and calcification. These results may be through CaSR interactions that were potentially activated by the release of calcium from MTA into the culture environment.

AB - Introduction: Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) is a therapeutic, endodontic repair material that is reported to exhibit calcified tissue-conductive activity although the mechanisms remain unclear. We hypothesize that the dissolution of calcium from MTA into the surrounding environment may play an important role in the osteoblastic/cementoblastic differentiation of human periodontal ligament cells (HPLCs). Methods: Two populations of HPLCs were obtained from two patients, respectively, and were cultured in the presence or absence of MTA discs and/or CaCl2 in order to investigate calcium release, calcification activity, calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) gene expression and bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2), and BMP-2 receptor protein and gene expression. Results: MTA released a substantial accumulation of calcium (4 mmol/L) within 14 days into culture media. After 4 weeks, the two populations of HPLCs independently exhibited calcification as well as BMP-2 distribution in the vicinity of MTA. HPLCs inherently expressed genes encoding for the CaSR and BMP-2 receptors. Exogenous CaCl2 media supplementation induced CaSR gene expression in HPLCs and calcification and BMP-2 synthesis throughout the entire HPLC cultures, whereas MgCl2 had no effect. Both MTA and CaCl2 stimulated BMP-2 gene expression above that of baseline levels. Conclusion: Here we show the first report showing that HPLCs cocultured directly with MTA up-regulated BMP2 expression and calcification. These results may be through CaSR interactions that were potentially activated by the release of calcium from MTA into the culture environment.

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