Movement of radiocaesium fallout released by the 2011 Fukushima nuclear accident

Koji Minoura, Tsutomu Yamada, Shin ichi Hirano, Shinji Sugihara

研究成果: ジャーナルへの寄稿記事

5 引用 (Scopus)

抄録

The moment magnitude (M w) 9.0 Tohoku-Oki Earthquake occurred on March 11, 2011, generating an unusually large tsunami. The seismic shocks and tsunami inundation severely damaged the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant. Radionuclide emission due to reactor breakdown contaminated wide areas of Fukushima and its surroundings. Heavy rainfall causes runoff across surface soil, and fine soil particles are susceptible to uptake by the flowing water. The high radioactivity of grains suspended in floodwater indicates that radioactive fallout was streamed into rivers in particulate form and transported downstream under high-flow conditions. Here, we investigated the diachronic mode of 134Cs and 137Cs in central Fukushima, through which the contaminated air mass drifted and caused wet deposition of radionuclides. Stratigraphic measurements of radioactivity in sediment cores is the method employed in this study to determine the basin-wide movement of 134Cs and 137Cs, to evaluate the significance of the erosion-transportation-accumulation processes on natural decontamination in terrain characterized by steep slopes and high precipitation. Stratigraphic results illustrate the process of fluvial sediment discharge, and the massive deposition of radiocaesium suggests basin-wide movement of fallout during concentrated rainfall. Grain suspension in torrential currents is an important pathway for transportation of radionuclides from land to sea, and the appearance of hotspots on floodplains and the offshore sea floor is the consequence of erosion and transportation under seasonal heavy precipitation. Radioactive horizons occur in offshore sediment columns and thus radiocaesium discharged from the estuary will persist forever under the sea floor if no artificial disturbance occurs.

元の言語英語
ページ(範囲)1843-1862
ページ数20
ジャーナルNatural Hazards
73
発行部数3
DOI
出版物ステータス出版済み - 1 1 2014

Fingerprint

nuclear accident
fallout
radionuclide
radioactivity
tsunami
seafloor
erosion
rainfall
wet deposition
nuclear power plant
basin
air mass
alluvial deposit
sediment core
floodplain
hot spot
soil surface
estuary
runoff
disturbance

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Water Science and Technology
  • Atmospheric Science
  • Earth and Planetary Sciences (miscellaneous)

これを引用

Movement of radiocaesium fallout released by the 2011 Fukushima nuclear accident. / Minoura, Koji; Yamada, Tsutomu; Hirano, Shin ichi; Sugihara, Shinji.

:: Natural Hazards, 巻 73, 番号 3, 01.01.2014, p. 1843-1862.

研究成果: ジャーナルへの寄稿記事

Minoura, Koji ; Yamada, Tsutomu ; Hirano, Shin ichi ; Sugihara, Shinji. / Movement of radiocaesium fallout released by the 2011 Fukushima nuclear accident. :: Natural Hazards. 2014 ; 巻 73, 番号 3. pp. 1843-1862.
@article{8cbe61ee2ff04ccbb39164920fb07bed,
title = "Movement of radiocaesium fallout released by the 2011 Fukushima nuclear accident",
abstract = "The moment magnitude (M w) 9.0 Tohoku-Oki Earthquake occurred on March 11, 2011, generating an unusually large tsunami. The seismic shocks and tsunami inundation severely damaged the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant. Radionuclide emission due to reactor breakdown contaminated wide areas of Fukushima and its surroundings. Heavy rainfall causes runoff across surface soil, and fine soil particles are susceptible to uptake by the flowing water. The high radioactivity of grains suspended in floodwater indicates that radioactive fallout was streamed into rivers in particulate form and transported downstream under high-flow conditions. Here, we investigated the diachronic mode of 134Cs and 137Cs in central Fukushima, through which the contaminated air mass drifted and caused wet deposition of radionuclides. Stratigraphic measurements of radioactivity in sediment cores is the method employed in this study to determine the basin-wide movement of 134Cs and 137Cs, to evaluate the significance of the erosion-transportation-accumulation processes on natural decontamination in terrain characterized by steep slopes and high precipitation. Stratigraphic results illustrate the process of fluvial sediment discharge, and the massive deposition of radiocaesium suggests basin-wide movement of fallout during concentrated rainfall. Grain suspension in torrential currents is an important pathway for transportation of radionuclides from land to sea, and the appearance of hotspots on floodplains and the offshore sea floor is the consequence of erosion and transportation under seasonal heavy precipitation. Radioactive horizons occur in offshore sediment columns and thus radiocaesium discharged from the estuary will persist forever under the sea floor if no artificial disturbance occurs.",
author = "Koji Minoura and Tsutomu Yamada and Hirano, {Shin ichi} and Shinji Sugihara",
year = "2014",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1007/s11069-014-1171-y",
language = "English",
volume = "73",
pages = "1843--1862",
journal = "Natural Hazards",
issn = "0921-030X",
publisher = "Springer Netherlands",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Movement of radiocaesium fallout released by the 2011 Fukushima nuclear accident

AU - Minoura, Koji

AU - Yamada, Tsutomu

AU - Hirano, Shin ichi

AU - Sugihara, Shinji

PY - 2014/1/1

Y1 - 2014/1/1

N2 - The moment magnitude (M w) 9.0 Tohoku-Oki Earthquake occurred on March 11, 2011, generating an unusually large tsunami. The seismic shocks and tsunami inundation severely damaged the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant. Radionuclide emission due to reactor breakdown contaminated wide areas of Fukushima and its surroundings. Heavy rainfall causes runoff across surface soil, and fine soil particles are susceptible to uptake by the flowing water. The high radioactivity of grains suspended in floodwater indicates that radioactive fallout was streamed into rivers in particulate form and transported downstream under high-flow conditions. Here, we investigated the diachronic mode of 134Cs and 137Cs in central Fukushima, through which the contaminated air mass drifted and caused wet deposition of radionuclides. Stratigraphic measurements of radioactivity in sediment cores is the method employed in this study to determine the basin-wide movement of 134Cs and 137Cs, to evaluate the significance of the erosion-transportation-accumulation processes on natural decontamination in terrain characterized by steep slopes and high precipitation. Stratigraphic results illustrate the process of fluvial sediment discharge, and the massive deposition of radiocaesium suggests basin-wide movement of fallout during concentrated rainfall. Grain suspension in torrential currents is an important pathway for transportation of radionuclides from land to sea, and the appearance of hotspots on floodplains and the offshore sea floor is the consequence of erosion and transportation under seasonal heavy precipitation. Radioactive horizons occur in offshore sediment columns and thus radiocaesium discharged from the estuary will persist forever under the sea floor if no artificial disturbance occurs.

AB - The moment magnitude (M w) 9.0 Tohoku-Oki Earthquake occurred on March 11, 2011, generating an unusually large tsunami. The seismic shocks and tsunami inundation severely damaged the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant. Radionuclide emission due to reactor breakdown contaminated wide areas of Fukushima and its surroundings. Heavy rainfall causes runoff across surface soil, and fine soil particles are susceptible to uptake by the flowing water. The high radioactivity of grains suspended in floodwater indicates that radioactive fallout was streamed into rivers in particulate form and transported downstream under high-flow conditions. Here, we investigated the diachronic mode of 134Cs and 137Cs in central Fukushima, through which the contaminated air mass drifted and caused wet deposition of radionuclides. Stratigraphic measurements of radioactivity in sediment cores is the method employed in this study to determine the basin-wide movement of 134Cs and 137Cs, to evaluate the significance of the erosion-transportation-accumulation processes on natural decontamination in terrain characterized by steep slopes and high precipitation. Stratigraphic results illustrate the process of fluvial sediment discharge, and the massive deposition of radiocaesium suggests basin-wide movement of fallout during concentrated rainfall. Grain suspension in torrential currents is an important pathway for transportation of radionuclides from land to sea, and the appearance of hotspots on floodplains and the offshore sea floor is the consequence of erosion and transportation under seasonal heavy precipitation. Radioactive horizons occur in offshore sediment columns and thus radiocaesium discharged from the estuary will persist forever under the sea floor if no artificial disturbance occurs.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84905715222&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84905715222&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/s11069-014-1171-y

DO - 10.1007/s11069-014-1171-y

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:84905715222

VL - 73

SP - 1843

EP - 1862

JO - Natural Hazards

JF - Natural Hazards

SN - 0921-030X

IS - 3

ER -