Nitrate leaching from Japanese temperate forest ecosystems in response to elevated atmospheric N deposition

Masaaki Chiwa, Ryunosuke Tateno, Takuo Hishi, Hideaki Shibata

研究成果: ジャーナルへの寄稿評論記事

抄録

The effects of elevated atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition on N cycling in Japanese forest ecosystems are reviewed here to assess the sensitivity of nitrate (NO 3 ) leaching from forests to streams in response to this deposition. Long-term monitoring of atmospheric N deposition throughout Japan suggests that long-range transport of air pollutants from East Asia accounts for recent increases in atmospheric N deposition in Japan. A new conceptual model of N saturation proposes that kinetic N saturation can be related to unavoidable hydrological nitrate (NO 3 ) loss from Japanese forests having an Asian monsoon climate with warm and wet summers. Soil microbes, including fungi and ammonia-oxidizing archaea, are important players in these forest ecosystems, affecting nutrient cycling in response to increased atmospheric N deposition. Similarly, a new framework based on a mycorrhizal-associated nutrient economy provides an understanding of NO 3 leaching in soils from temperate forests, suggesting that arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM)-dominated forests leach more NO 3 in response to N deposition than ectomycorrhizal fungi-dominated forests. Because Japanese cedar and cypress are AM-associated trees, they are likely susceptible to NO 3 leaching. Maturation and poor management of such plantations may accelerate NO 3 leaching. Grazing by increasing deer populations also enhances NO 3 leaching from the soil system. We argue that several factors, including long-range transport of air pollutants, an Asian monsoon climate setting, as well as maturation and poor management of AM-associated plantations, will make Japanese temperate forests more sensitive to increased atmospheric N deposition in East Asia over the next decades.

元の言語英語
ページ(範囲)1-15
ページ数15
ジャーナルJournal of Forest Research
24
発行部数1
DOI
出版物ステータス出版済み - 1 2 2019

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temperate forests
temperate forest
forest ecosystems
forest ecosystem
leaching
nitrates
nitrate
air transportation
East Asia
long range transport
plantations
pollutants
Japan
climate
maturation
fungi
Cryptomeria japonica
monsoon
plantation
Archaea

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Forestry

これを引用

Nitrate leaching from Japanese temperate forest ecosystems in response to elevated atmospheric N deposition. / Chiwa, Masaaki; Tateno, Ryunosuke; Hishi, Takuo; Shibata, Hideaki.

:: Journal of Forest Research, 巻 24, 番号 1, 02.01.2019, p. 1-15.

研究成果: ジャーナルへの寄稿評論記事

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abstract = "The effects of elevated atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition on N cycling in Japanese forest ecosystems are reviewed here to assess the sensitivity of nitrate (NO 3 − ) leaching from forests to streams in response to this deposition. Long-term monitoring of atmospheric N deposition throughout Japan suggests that long-range transport of air pollutants from East Asia accounts for recent increases in atmospheric N deposition in Japan. A new conceptual model of N saturation proposes that kinetic N saturation can be related to unavoidable hydrological nitrate (NO 3 − ) loss from Japanese forests having an Asian monsoon climate with warm and wet summers. Soil microbes, including fungi and ammonia-oxidizing archaea, are important players in these forest ecosystems, affecting nutrient cycling in response to increased atmospheric N deposition. Similarly, a new framework based on a mycorrhizal-associated nutrient economy provides an understanding of NO 3 − leaching in soils from temperate forests, suggesting that arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM)-dominated forests leach more NO 3 − in response to N deposition than ectomycorrhizal fungi-dominated forests. Because Japanese cedar and cypress are AM-associated trees, they are likely susceptible to NO 3 − leaching. Maturation and poor management of such plantations may accelerate NO 3 − leaching. Grazing by increasing deer populations also enhances NO 3 − leaching from the soil system. We argue that several factors, including long-range transport of air pollutants, an Asian monsoon climate setting, as well as maturation and poor management of AM-associated plantations, will make Japanese temperate forests more sensitive to increased atmospheric N deposition in East Asia over the next decades.",
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AB - The effects of elevated atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition on N cycling in Japanese forest ecosystems are reviewed here to assess the sensitivity of nitrate (NO 3 − ) leaching from forests to streams in response to this deposition. Long-term monitoring of atmospheric N deposition throughout Japan suggests that long-range transport of air pollutants from East Asia accounts for recent increases in atmospheric N deposition in Japan. A new conceptual model of N saturation proposes that kinetic N saturation can be related to unavoidable hydrological nitrate (NO 3 − ) loss from Japanese forests having an Asian monsoon climate with warm and wet summers. Soil microbes, including fungi and ammonia-oxidizing archaea, are important players in these forest ecosystems, affecting nutrient cycling in response to increased atmospheric N deposition. Similarly, a new framework based on a mycorrhizal-associated nutrient economy provides an understanding of NO 3 − leaching in soils from temperate forests, suggesting that arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM)-dominated forests leach more NO 3 − in response to N deposition than ectomycorrhizal fungi-dominated forests. Because Japanese cedar and cypress are AM-associated trees, they are likely susceptible to NO 3 − leaching. Maturation and poor management of such plantations may accelerate NO 3 − leaching. Grazing by increasing deer populations also enhances NO 3 − leaching from the soil system. We argue that several factors, including long-range transport of air pollutants, an Asian monsoon climate setting, as well as maturation and poor management of AM-associated plantations, will make Japanese temperate forests more sensitive to increased atmospheric N deposition in East Asia over the next decades.

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