Overview of Venus orbiterAkatsuki

M. Nakamura, T. Imamura, N. Ishii, T. Abe, T. Satoh, M. Suzuki, M. Ueno, A. Yamazaki, N. Iwagami, S. Watanabe, M. Taguchi, T. Fukuhara, Y. Takahashi, M. Yamada, N. Hoshino, S. Ohtsuki, K. Uemizu, G. L. Hashimoto, M. Takagi, Y. MatsudaK. Ogohara, N. Sato, Y. Kasaba, T. Kouyama, N. Hirata, R. Nakamura, Y. Yamamoto, N. Okada, T. Horinouchi, Masaru Yamamoto, Y. Hayashi

研究成果: ジャーナルへの寄稿評論記事

54 引用 (Scopus)

抄録

The Akatsuki spacecraft of Japan was launched on May 21, 2010. The spacecraft planned to enter a Venusencircling near-equatorial orbit in December 7, 2010; however, the Venus orbit insertion maneuver has failed, and at present the spacecraft is orbiting the Sun. There is a possibility of conducting an orbit insertion maneuver again several years later. The main goal of the mission is to understand the Venusian atmospheric dynamics and cloud physics, with the explorations of the ground surface and the interplanetary dust also being the themes. The angular motion of the spacecraft is roughly synchronized with the zonal flow near the cloud base for roughly 20 hours centered at the apoapsis. Seen from this portion of the orbit, cloud features below the spacecraft continue to be observed over 20 hours, and thus the precise determination of atmospheric motions is possible. The onboard science instruments sense multiple height levels of the atmosphere to model the three-dimensional structure and dynamics. The lower clouds, the lower atmosphere and the surface are imaged by utilizing nearinfrared windows. The cloud top structure is mapped by using scattered ultraviolet radiation and thermal infrared radiation. Lightning discharge is searched for by high speed sampling of lightning flashes. Night airglow is observed at visible wavelengths. Radio occultation complements the imaging observations principally by determining the vertical temperature structure.

元の言語英語
ページ(範囲)443-457
ページ数15
ジャーナルearth, planets and space
63
発行部数5
DOI
出版物ステータス出版済み - 1 1 2011

Fingerprint

Venus (planet)
Venus
spacecraft
orbit insertion
lightning
maneuvers
cloud physics
equatorial orbits
nightglow
atmospheric motion
interplanetary dust
radio occultation
atmospheric dynamics
lower atmosphere
zonal flow
infrared radiation
airglow
atmosphere
ultraviolet radiation
angular velocity

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Geology
  • Space and Planetary Science

これを引用

Nakamura, M., Imamura, T., Ishii, N., Abe, T., Satoh, T., Suzuki, M., ... Hayashi, Y. (2011). Overview of Venus orbiterAkatsuki. earth, planets and space, 63(5), 443-457. https://doi.org/10.5047/eps.2011.02.009

Overview of Venus orbiterAkatsuki. / Nakamura, M.; Imamura, T.; Ishii, N.; Abe, T.; Satoh, T.; Suzuki, M.; Ueno, M.; Yamazaki, A.; Iwagami, N.; Watanabe, S.; Taguchi, M.; Fukuhara, T.; Takahashi, Y.; Yamada, M.; Hoshino, N.; Ohtsuki, S.; Uemizu, K.; Hashimoto, G. L.; Takagi, M.; Matsuda, Y.; Ogohara, K.; Sato, N.; Kasaba, Y.; Kouyama, T.; Hirata, N.; Nakamura, R.; Yamamoto, Y.; Okada, N.; Horinouchi, T.; Yamamoto, Masaru; Hayashi, Y.

:: earth, planets and space, 巻 63, 番号 5, 01.01.2011, p. 443-457.

研究成果: ジャーナルへの寄稿評論記事

Nakamura, M, Imamura, T, Ishii, N, Abe, T, Satoh, T, Suzuki, M, Ueno, M, Yamazaki, A, Iwagami, N, Watanabe, S, Taguchi, M, Fukuhara, T, Takahashi, Y, Yamada, M, Hoshino, N, Ohtsuki, S, Uemizu, K, Hashimoto, GL, Takagi, M, Matsuda, Y, Ogohara, K, Sato, N, Kasaba, Y, Kouyama, T, Hirata, N, Nakamura, R, Yamamoto, Y, Okada, N, Horinouchi, T, Yamamoto, M & Hayashi, Y 2011, 'Overview of Venus orbiterAkatsuki', earth, planets and space, 巻. 63, 番号 5, pp. 443-457. https://doi.org/10.5047/eps.2011.02.009
Nakamura M, Imamura T, Ishii N, Abe T, Satoh T, Suzuki M その他. Overview of Venus orbiterAkatsuki. earth, planets and space. 2011 1 1;63(5):443-457. https://doi.org/10.5047/eps.2011.02.009
Nakamura, M. ; Imamura, T. ; Ishii, N. ; Abe, T. ; Satoh, T. ; Suzuki, M. ; Ueno, M. ; Yamazaki, A. ; Iwagami, N. ; Watanabe, S. ; Taguchi, M. ; Fukuhara, T. ; Takahashi, Y. ; Yamada, M. ; Hoshino, N. ; Ohtsuki, S. ; Uemizu, K. ; Hashimoto, G. L. ; Takagi, M. ; Matsuda, Y. ; Ogohara, K. ; Sato, N. ; Kasaba, Y. ; Kouyama, T. ; Hirata, N. ; Nakamura, R. ; Yamamoto, Y. ; Okada, N. ; Horinouchi, T. ; Yamamoto, Masaru ; Hayashi, Y. / Overview of Venus orbiterAkatsuki. :: earth, planets and space. 2011 ; 巻 63, 番号 5. pp. 443-457.
@article{721ddc7626b84e11b3a01bcb894f8c1a,
title = "Overview of Venus orbiterAkatsuki",
abstract = "The Akatsuki spacecraft of Japan was launched on May 21, 2010. The spacecraft planned to enter a Venusencircling near-equatorial orbit in December 7, 2010; however, the Venus orbit insertion maneuver has failed, and at present the spacecraft is orbiting the Sun. There is a possibility of conducting an orbit insertion maneuver again several years later. The main goal of the mission is to understand the Venusian atmospheric dynamics and cloud physics, with the explorations of the ground surface and the interplanetary dust also being the themes. The angular motion of the spacecraft is roughly synchronized with the zonal flow near the cloud base for roughly 20 hours centered at the apoapsis. Seen from this portion of the orbit, cloud features below the spacecraft continue to be observed over 20 hours, and thus the precise determination of atmospheric motions is possible. The onboard science instruments sense multiple height levels of the atmosphere to model the three-dimensional structure and dynamics. The lower clouds, the lower atmosphere and the surface are imaged by utilizing nearinfrared windows. The cloud top structure is mapped by using scattered ultraviolet radiation and thermal infrared radiation. Lightning discharge is searched for by high speed sampling of lightning flashes. Night airglow is observed at visible wavelengths. Radio occultation complements the imaging observations principally by determining the vertical temperature structure.",
author = "M. Nakamura and T. Imamura and N. Ishii and T. Abe and T. Satoh and M. Suzuki and M. Ueno and A. Yamazaki and N. Iwagami and S. Watanabe and M. Taguchi and T. Fukuhara and Y. Takahashi and M. Yamada and N. Hoshino and S. Ohtsuki and K. Uemizu and Hashimoto, {G. L.} and M. Takagi and Y. Matsuda and K. Ogohara and N. Sato and Y. Kasaba and T. Kouyama and N. Hirata and R. Nakamura and Y. Yamamoto and N. Okada and T. Horinouchi and Masaru Yamamoto and Y. Hayashi",
year = "2011",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.5047/eps.2011.02.009",
language = "English",
volume = "63",
pages = "443--457",
journal = "Earth, Planets and Space",
issn = "1343-8832",
publisher = "Terra Scientific Publishing Company",
number = "5",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Overview of Venus orbiterAkatsuki

AU - Nakamura, M.

AU - Imamura, T.

AU - Ishii, N.

AU - Abe, T.

AU - Satoh, T.

AU - Suzuki, M.

AU - Ueno, M.

AU - Yamazaki, A.

AU - Iwagami, N.

AU - Watanabe, S.

AU - Taguchi, M.

AU - Fukuhara, T.

AU - Takahashi, Y.

AU - Yamada, M.

AU - Hoshino, N.

AU - Ohtsuki, S.

AU - Uemizu, K.

AU - Hashimoto, G. L.

AU - Takagi, M.

AU - Matsuda, Y.

AU - Ogohara, K.

AU - Sato, N.

AU - Kasaba, Y.

AU - Kouyama, T.

AU - Hirata, N.

AU - Nakamura, R.

AU - Yamamoto, Y.

AU - Okada, N.

AU - Horinouchi, T.

AU - Yamamoto, Masaru

AU - Hayashi, Y.

PY - 2011/1/1

Y1 - 2011/1/1

N2 - The Akatsuki spacecraft of Japan was launched on May 21, 2010. The spacecraft planned to enter a Venusencircling near-equatorial orbit in December 7, 2010; however, the Venus orbit insertion maneuver has failed, and at present the spacecraft is orbiting the Sun. There is a possibility of conducting an orbit insertion maneuver again several years later. The main goal of the mission is to understand the Venusian atmospheric dynamics and cloud physics, with the explorations of the ground surface and the interplanetary dust also being the themes. The angular motion of the spacecraft is roughly synchronized with the zonal flow near the cloud base for roughly 20 hours centered at the apoapsis. Seen from this portion of the orbit, cloud features below the spacecraft continue to be observed over 20 hours, and thus the precise determination of atmospheric motions is possible. The onboard science instruments sense multiple height levels of the atmosphere to model the three-dimensional structure and dynamics. The lower clouds, the lower atmosphere and the surface are imaged by utilizing nearinfrared windows. The cloud top structure is mapped by using scattered ultraviolet radiation and thermal infrared radiation. Lightning discharge is searched for by high speed sampling of lightning flashes. Night airglow is observed at visible wavelengths. Radio occultation complements the imaging observations principally by determining the vertical temperature structure.

AB - The Akatsuki spacecraft of Japan was launched on May 21, 2010. The spacecraft planned to enter a Venusencircling near-equatorial orbit in December 7, 2010; however, the Venus orbit insertion maneuver has failed, and at present the spacecraft is orbiting the Sun. There is a possibility of conducting an orbit insertion maneuver again several years later. The main goal of the mission is to understand the Venusian atmospheric dynamics and cloud physics, with the explorations of the ground surface and the interplanetary dust also being the themes. The angular motion of the spacecraft is roughly synchronized with the zonal flow near the cloud base for roughly 20 hours centered at the apoapsis. Seen from this portion of the orbit, cloud features below the spacecraft continue to be observed over 20 hours, and thus the precise determination of atmospheric motions is possible. The onboard science instruments sense multiple height levels of the atmosphere to model the three-dimensional structure and dynamics. The lower clouds, the lower atmosphere and the surface are imaged by utilizing nearinfrared windows. The cloud top structure is mapped by using scattered ultraviolet radiation and thermal infrared radiation. Lightning discharge is searched for by high speed sampling of lightning flashes. Night airglow is observed at visible wavelengths. Radio occultation complements the imaging observations principally by determining the vertical temperature structure.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=79960799353&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=79960799353&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.5047/eps.2011.02.009

DO - 10.5047/eps.2011.02.009

M3 - Review article

AN - SCOPUS:79960799353

VL - 63

SP - 443

EP - 457

JO - Earth, Planets and Space

JF - Earth, Planets and Space

SN - 1343-8832

IS - 5

ER -