Pop religion in Japan

Buddhist temples, icons, and branding

Elisabetta Porcu

研究成果: ジャーナルへの寄稿記事

5 引用 (Scopus)

抄録

The need manifested by Japanese Buddhist organizations to present themselves as "modern" forces that are relevant to present-day society seems to be central in shaping their communication strategies. In this regard, one interesting aspect is represented by religious institutions' attempts to "brand" themselves to enhance their profiles and visibility, specifically by drawing on popular culture formats. Based on fieldwork in Japan, I examine the use made by Japanese Buddhist institutions of these formats in their attempt to revive Buddhism and make its teachings attractive to an audience greater than the elderly parishioners who still maintain contact with their temples, mainly for funerary rites and other memorial rituals related to the ancestors.

元の言語英語
ページ(範囲)157-172
ページ数16
ジャーナルJournal of Religion and Popular Culture
26
発行部数2
DOI
出版物ステータス出版済み - 1 1 2014

Fingerprint

Japan
Religion
Buddhism
popular culture
memorial
ritual
religious behavior
contact
communication
present
Teaching
Branding
Icon
Buddhist
Temple
Society
Communication Strategies
Field Work
Popular Culture
Memorial

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Cultural Studies
  • Religious studies

これを引用

Pop religion in Japan : Buddhist temples, icons, and branding. / Porcu, Elisabetta.

:: Journal of Religion and Popular Culture, 巻 26, 番号 2, 01.01.2014, p. 157-172.

研究成果: ジャーナルへの寄稿記事

Porcu, Elisabetta. / Pop religion in Japan : Buddhist temples, icons, and branding. :: Journal of Religion and Popular Culture. 2014 ; 巻 26, 番号 2. pp. 157-172.
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