Postoperative Skeletal Muscle Loss Predicts Poor Prognosis of Adenocarcinoma of Upper Stomach and Esophagogastric Junction

Kensuke Kudou, Hiroshi Saeki, Yuichiro Nakashima, Koichi Kimura, Koji Ando, Eiji Oki, Tetsuo Ikeda, Yoshihiko Maehara

研究成果: ジャーナルへの寄稿記事

2 引用 (Scopus)

抄録

Background: The relationship between postoperative changes in muscle mass and the prognosis of malignancies remains controversial. We aimed to determine whether a decrease in skeletal muscle mass after surgical resection can predict long-term outcomes in patients with adenocarcinoma of upper stomach (AUS) and esophagogastric junction (AEGJ). Methods: We reviewed 146 patients who underwent curative surgery for AUS and AEGJ. We assessed the skeletal muscle index pre- and post-surgery and 6 months postoperatively. The rate of decrease in skeletal muscle index (SMI) was calculated and its relationship with clinicopathological factors and prognosis was analyzed. Results: Among the 146 patients studied, 115 underwent re-assessment of SMI 6 months postoperatively. The mean decrease in SMI was more prominent in patients with recurrence than in those without recurrence (19.0 ± 2.3 vs. 7.4 ± 0.9%, respectively, P < 0.0001). AUS and AEGJ patients with a >19% decrease in SMI showed significantly lower 5-year overall survival and recurrence-free rates than those with a <19% decrease in SMI (recurrence-free survival: 33.4 vs. 89.2%, respectively, P < 0.0001; overall survival: 40.6 vs. 90.0%, respectively, P < 0.0001). Multivariate analyses indicated that a ≥19% decrease in SMI could predict poor overall survival independently in patients with AUS and AEGJ (P = 0.0070). Conclusions: A ≥19% postoperative decrease in SMI was substantially associated with poor survival in patients with AUS and AEGJ.

元の言語英語
ページ(範囲)1068-1075
ページ数8
ジャーナルWorld journal of surgery
43
発行部数4
DOI
出版物ステータス出版済み - 4 15 2019

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Esophagogastric Junction
Stomach
Skeletal Muscle
Adenocarcinoma
Survival
Recurrence
Multivariate Analysis
Muscles

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery

これを引用

Postoperative Skeletal Muscle Loss Predicts Poor Prognosis of Adenocarcinoma of Upper Stomach and Esophagogastric Junction. / Kudou, Kensuke; Saeki, Hiroshi; Nakashima, Yuichiro; Kimura, Koichi; Ando, Koji; Oki, Eiji; Ikeda, Tetsuo; Maehara, Yoshihiko.

:: World journal of surgery, 巻 43, 番号 4, 15.04.2019, p. 1068-1075.

研究成果: ジャーナルへの寄稿記事

Kudou, Kensuke ; Saeki, Hiroshi ; Nakashima, Yuichiro ; Kimura, Koichi ; Ando, Koji ; Oki, Eiji ; Ikeda, Tetsuo ; Maehara, Yoshihiko. / Postoperative Skeletal Muscle Loss Predicts Poor Prognosis of Adenocarcinoma of Upper Stomach and Esophagogastric Junction. :: World journal of surgery. 2019 ; 巻 43, 番号 4. pp. 1068-1075.
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title = "Postoperative Skeletal Muscle Loss Predicts Poor Prognosis of Adenocarcinoma of Upper Stomach and Esophagogastric Junction",
abstract = "Background: The relationship between postoperative changes in muscle mass and the prognosis of malignancies remains controversial. We aimed to determine whether a decrease in skeletal muscle mass after surgical resection can predict long-term outcomes in patients with adenocarcinoma of upper stomach (AUS) and esophagogastric junction (AEGJ). Methods: We reviewed 146 patients who underwent curative surgery for AUS and AEGJ. We assessed the skeletal muscle index pre- and post-surgery and 6 months postoperatively. The rate of decrease in skeletal muscle index (SMI) was calculated and its relationship with clinicopathological factors and prognosis was analyzed. Results: Among the 146 patients studied, 115 underwent re-assessment of SMI 6 months postoperatively. The mean decrease in SMI was more prominent in patients with recurrence than in those without recurrence (19.0 ± 2.3 vs. 7.4 ± 0.9{\%}, respectively, P < 0.0001). AUS and AEGJ patients with a >19{\%} decrease in SMI showed significantly lower 5-year overall survival and recurrence-free rates than those with a <19{\%} decrease in SMI (recurrence-free survival: 33.4 vs. 89.2{\%}, respectively, P < 0.0001; overall survival: 40.6 vs. 90.0{\%}, respectively, P < 0.0001). Multivariate analyses indicated that a ≥19{\%} decrease in SMI could predict poor overall survival independently in patients with AUS and AEGJ (P = 0.0070). Conclusions: A ≥19{\%} postoperative decrease in SMI was substantially associated with poor survival in patients with AUS and AEGJ.",
author = "Kensuke Kudou and Hiroshi Saeki and Yuichiro Nakashima and Koichi Kimura and Koji Ando and Eiji Oki and Tetsuo Ikeda and Yoshihiko Maehara",
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T1 - Postoperative Skeletal Muscle Loss Predicts Poor Prognosis of Adenocarcinoma of Upper Stomach and Esophagogastric Junction

AU - Kudou, Kensuke

AU - Saeki, Hiroshi

AU - Nakashima, Yuichiro

AU - Kimura, Koichi

AU - Ando, Koji

AU - Oki, Eiji

AU - Ikeda, Tetsuo

AU - Maehara, Yoshihiko

PY - 2019/4/15

Y1 - 2019/4/15

N2 - Background: The relationship between postoperative changes in muscle mass and the prognosis of malignancies remains controversial. We aimed to determine whether a decrease in skeletal muscle mass after surgical resection can predict long-term outcomes in patients with adenocarcinoma of upper stomach (AUS) and esophagogastric junction (AEGJ). Methods: We reviewed 146 patients who underwent curative surgery for AUS and AEGJ. We assessed the skeletal muscle index pre- and post-surgery and 6 months postoperatively. The rate of decrease in skeletal muscle index (SMI) was calculated and its relationship with clinicopathological factors and prognosis was analyzed. Results: Among the 146 patients studied, 115 underwent re-assessment of SMI 6 months postoperatively. The mean decrease in SMI was more prominent in patients with recurrence than in those without recurrence (19.0 ± 2.3 vs. 7.4 ± 0.9%, respectively, P < 0.0001). AUS and AEGJ patients with a >19% decrease in SMI showed significantly lower 5-year overall survival and recurrence-free rates than those with a <19% decrease in SMI (recurrence-free survival: 33.4 vs. 89.2%, respectively, P < 0.0001; overall survival: 40.6 vs. 90.0%, respectively, P < 0.0001). Multivariate analyses indicated that a ≥19% decrease in SMI could predict poor overall survival independently in patients with AUS and AEGJ (P = 0.0070). Conclusions: A ≥19% postoperative decrease in SMI was substantially associated with poor survival in patients with AUS and AEGJ.

AB - Background: The relationship between postoperative changes in muscle mass and the prognosis of malignancies remains controversial. We aimed to determine whether a decrease in skeletal muscle mass after surgical resection can predict long-term outcomes in patients with adenocarcinoma of upper stomach (AUS) and esophagogastric junction (AEGJ). Methods: We reviewed 146 patients who underwent curative surgery for AUS and AEGJ. We assessed the skeletal muscle index pre- and post-surgery and 6 months postoperatively. The rate of decrease in skeletal muscle index (SMI) was calculated and its relationship with clinicopathological factors and prognosis was analyzed. Results: Among the 146 patients studied, 115 underwent re-assessment of SMI 6 months postoperatively. The mean decrease in SMI was more prominent in patients with recurrence than in those without recurrence (19.0 ± 2.3 vs. 7.4 ± 0.9%, respectively, P < 0.0001). AUS and AEGJ patients with a >19% decrease in SMI showed significantly lower 5-year overall survival and recurrence-free rates than those with a <19% decrease in SMI (recurrence-free survival: 33.4 vs. 89.2%, respectively, P < 0.0001; overall survival: 40.6 vs. 90.0%, respectively, P < 0.0001). Multivariate analyses indicated that a ≥19% decrease in SMI could predict poor overall survival independently in patients with AUS and AEGJ (P = 0.0070). Conclusions: A ≥19% postoperative decrease in SMI was substantially associated with poor survival in patients with AUS and AEGJ.

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