Processing of Japanese Cleft Constructions in Context

Evidence from Event-Related Brain Potentials

Masataka Yano, Yuki Tateyama, Tsutomu Sakamoto

研究成果: ジャーナルへの寄稿記事

5 引用 (Scopus)

抄録

Numerous studies have found “subject gap preference” in relative clauses and cleft constructions in English, French, and other languages. In contrast, previous studies have reported “object gap preference” in cleft constructions in Japanese. However, the effect of integrating a filler and its gap may be influenced by the effect of transitional probabilities, so previous studies confounded these two factors. This study explores processing asymmetries in Japanese cleft constructions by conducting an event-related brain potential experiment by controlling transitional probabilities. The results demonstrate that the subject gap preference in Japanese is well aligned with that observed in other languages, suggesting that subject gap preference is a universal aspect of language comprehension.

元の言語英語
記事番号5
ページ(範囲)277-286
ページ数10
ジャーナルJournal of Psycholinguistic Research
44
発行部数3
DOI
出版物ステータス出版済み - 6 22 2015

Fingerprint

Evoked Potentials
brain
Language
event
Brain
evidence
language
asymmetry
comprehension
Cleft Constructions
Event-related Brain Potentials
experiment

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Language and Linguistics
  • Linguistics and Language
  • Psychology(all)

これを引用

Processing of Japanese Cleft Constructions in Context : Evidence from Event-Related Brain Potentials. / Yano, Masataka; Tateyama, Yuki; Sakamoto, Tsutomu.

:: Journal of Psycholinguistic Research, 巻 44, 番号 3, 5, 22.06.2015, p. 277-286.

研究成果: ジャーナルへの寄稿記事

@article{5dd6a82c8fed4f51991275b3c50ffe03,
title = "Processing of Japanese Cleft Constructions in Context: Evidence from Event-Related Brain Potentials",
abstract = "Numerous studies have found “subject gap preference” in relative clauses and cleft constructions in English, French, and other languages. In contrast, previous studies have reported “object gap preference” in cleft constructions in Japanese. However, the effect of integrating a filler and its gap may be influenced by the effect of transitional probabilities, so previous studies confounded these two factors. This study explores processing asymmetries in Japanese cleft constructions by conducting an event-related brain potential experiment by controlling transitional probabilities. The results demonstrate that the subject gap preference in Japanese is well aligned with that observed in other languages, suggesting that subject gap preference is a universal aspect of language comprehension.",
author = "Masataka Yano and Yuki Tateyama and Tsutomu Sakamoto",
year = "2015",
month = "6",
day = "22",
doi = "10.1007/s10936-014-9294-6",
language = "English",
volume = "44",
pages = "277--286",
journal = "Journal of Psycholinguistic Research",
issn = "0090-6905",
publisher = "Springer New York",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Processing of Japanese Cleft Constructions in Context

T2 - Evidence from Event-Related Brain Potentials

AU - Yano, Masataka

AU - Tateyama, Yuki

AU - Sakamoto, Tsutomu

PY - 2015/6/22

Y1 - 2015/6/22

N2 - Numerous studies have found “subject gap preference” in relative clauses and cleft constructions in English, French, and other languages. In contrast, previous studies have reported “object gap preference” in cleft constructions in Japanese. However, the effect of integrating a filler and its gap may be influenced by the effect of transitional probabilities, so previous studies confounded these two factors. This study explores processing asymmetries in Japanese cleft constructions by conducting an event-related brain potential experiment by controlling transitional probabilities. The results demonstrate that the subject gap preference in Japanese is well aligned with that observed in other languages, suggesting that subject gap preference is a universal aspect of language comprehension.

AB - Numerous studies have found “subject gap preference” in relative clauses and cleft constructions in English, French, and other languages. In contrast, previous studies have reported “object gap preference” in cleft constructions in Japanese. However, the effect of integrating a filler and its gap may be influenced by the effect of transitional probabilities, so previous studies confounded these two factors. This study explores processing asymmetries in Japanese cleft constructions by conducting an event-related brain potential experiment by controlling transitional probabilities. The results demonstrate that the subject gap preference in Japanese is well aligned with that observed in other languages, suggesting that subject gap preference is a universal aspect of language comprehension.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84896409975&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84896409975&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/s10936-014-9294-6

DO - 10.1007/s10936-014-9294-6

M3 - Article

VL - 44

SP - 277

EP - 286

JO - Journal of Psycholinguistic Research

JF - Journal of Psycholinguistic Research

SN - 0090-6905

IS - 3

M1 - 5

ER -