Radiation-induced spinal cord glioblastoma with cerebrospinal fluid dissemination subsequent to treatment of lymphoblastic lymphoma

Yuichiro Kikkawa, Satoshi O. Suzuki, Akira Nakamizo, Ryosuke Tsuchimochi, Nobuya Murakami, Tadamasa Yoshitake, Shinichi Aishima, Fumihiko Okubo, Nobuhiro Hata, Toshiyuki Amano, Koji Yoshimoto, Masahiro Mizoguchi, Toru Iwaki, Tomio Sasaki

研究成果: ジャーナルへの寄稿記事

3 引用 (Scopus)

抄録

Background: Radiation-induced glioma arising in the spinal cord is extremely rare. We report a case of radiation-induced spinal cord glioblastoma with cerebrospinal fuid (CSF) dissemination 10 years after radiotherapy for T-cell lymphoblastic lymphoma. Case Description: A 32-year-old male with a history of T-cell lymphoblastic lymphoma presented with progressive gait disturbance and sensory disturbance below the T4 dermatome 10 years after mediastinal irradiation. Gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) imaging revealed an intramedullary tumor extending from the C6 to the T6 level, corresponding to the previous radiation site, and periventricular enhanced lesions. In this case, the spinal lesion was not directly diagnosed because the patient refused any kind of spinal surgery to avoid worsening of neurological defcits. However, based on a biopsy of an intracranial disseminated lesion and repeated immmunocytochemical examination of CSF cytology, we diagnosed the spinal tumor as a radiation-induced glioblastoma. The patient was treated with radiotherapy plus concomitant and adjuvant temozolomide. Then, the spinal tumor was markedly reduced in size, and the dissemination disappeared. Conclusion: We describe our detailed diagnostic process and emphasize the diagnostic importance of immunocytochemical analysis of CSF cytology. Copyright:

元の言語英語
記事番号107905
ジャーナルSurgical Neurology International
4
発行部数1
DOI
出版物ステータス出版済み - 1 1 2013

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Glioblastoma
Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma
Cerebrospinal Fluid
Spinal Cord
T-Cell Lymphoma
temozolomide
Radiation
Cell Biology
Radiotherapy
Background Radiation
Neoplasms
Gadolinium
Gait
Glioma
Therapeutics
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Biopsy

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery
  • Clinical Neurology

これを引用

Radiation-induced spinal cord glioblastoma with cerebrospinal fluid dissemination subsequent to treatment of lymphoblastic lymphoma. / Kikkawa, Yuichiro; Suzuki, Satoshi O.; Nakamizo, Akira; Tsuchimochi, Ryosuke; Murakami, Nobuya; Yoshitake, Tadamasa; Aishima, Shinichi; Okubo, Fumihiko; Hata, Nobuhiro; Amano, Toshiyuki; Yoshimoto, Koji; Mizoguchi, Masahiro; Iwaki, Toru; Sasaki, Tomio.

:: Surgical Neurology International, 巻 4, 番号 1, 107905, 01.01.2013.

研究成果: ジャーナルへの寄稿記事

Kikkawa, Yuichiro ; Suzuki, Satoshi O. ; Nakamizo, Akira ; Tsuchimochi, Ryosuke ; Murakami, Nobuya ; Yoshitake, Tadamasa ; Aishima, Shinichi ; Okubo, Fumihiko ; Hata, Nobuhiro ; Amano, Toshiyuki ; Yoshimoto, Koji ; Mizoguchi, Masahiro ; Iwaki, Toru ; Sasaki, Tomio. / Radiation-induced spinal cord glioblastoma with cerebrospinal fluid dissemination subsequent to treatment of lymphoblastic lymphoma. :: Surgical Neurology International. 2013 ; 巻 4, 番号 1.
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AU - Nakamizo, Akira

AU - Tsuchimochi, Ryosuke

AU - Murakami, Nobuya

AU - Yoshitake, Tadamasa

AU - Aishima, Shinichi

AU - Okubo, Fumihiko

AU - Hata, Nobuhiro

AU - Amano, Toshiyuki

AU - Yoshimoto, Koji

AU - Mizoguchi, Masahiro

AU - Iwaki, Toru

AU - Sasaki, Tomio

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